Rss

More than 1,000 New Yorkers tested positive for COVID-19 in a single day Friday, marking the first time since June 5 the state has seen a daily number that high

Rss

Art historian Dr. Midori Yamamura

Brooklyn, NY – Kingsborough Community College (KCC) has issued an invitation for proposals for UnHomeless NYC, an art exhibition scheduled to take place at the Kingsborough Art Museum in the fall of 2021. The organizers encourage participants to consider the causes of homelessness and their vision to end it. They hope the works will engage students beyond the traditional confines of the museum walls. The title was suggested by a KCC alum, who felt a new word was needed to describe the process of moving from being homeless to having a home.

The project is the brainchild of art historian Dr. Midori Yamamura and photographer Tommy Mintz, assistant professors in the art department at Kingsborough Community College. Mintz invited Queens College Professor Emerita Maureen Conner to assist organizing the artist roster.

“I’ve been interested in homeless issues for a while,” said Yamamura. “Homelessness is not a choice. Most cases are caused by the society.”

During a visit to Grand Central Station, she’d noticed that the space lacked empathy to the many homeless people who considered it a safe place to rest. “I want to change people’s way of thinking about others and urban space.” She shared her thoughts with colleagues at Kingsborough Community College.

“The idea for this project grew from our discussions with other junior professors at the College, including communications professor Laura Spinu, and political science professor Jason Leggett,” added Yamamura. “Throughout last semester, we worked as a group and invited people from the community, including formerly homeless activists, an advocacy organization, three artists, and other educators.”

“What interested me in Midori’s project is the idea that art can create spaces for discussions of commonly held ideas that are difficult to approach,” noted Mintz. “Homelessness is a society-created experience, and therefore changeable by society. Through discussing this issue at all levels — beginning with students — we can understand how to make new decisions about equitable land use.”

The group is also working with other CUNY colleges to explore how humanities programs, like the arts, can provide more meaningful experiences for students.  Yamamura plans to implement the project in her Global Contemporary Art class this semester.

 

Student, graduate, and working artists are invited to submit proposals for the UnHomeless NYC exhibition by October 14, 2020. The exhibition is scheduled for next fall. Please include your contact information, a 500-word description, up to 3 sketches, a list of needed materials, a rough budget, and 1–3 examples of past work. Questions can be directed to thomas.mintz@kbcc.cuny.edu and midori.yamamura@kbcc.cuny.edu.

 

About Kingsborough Community College

Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top 10 Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

 

###

Rss

Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, University of California Regent Richard Blum, has been named by the state auditor’s office as one of the regents involved in an admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of students as favors to well-connected people

Rss

CUNY SPH Annual Report_2020 coverDear Colleagues,
 
I am delighted to share with you the online version of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy Annual Report for 2019-2020.
 
Despite the challenges that the past year brought, CUNY SPH faculty, students, and staff worked together to make it one of our most successful ever.
 
I invite you to peruse the report and read about the advances we have achieved with regard to increased enrollment, expanded curriculum, student support, and research productivity.
 
I hope you find it both interesting and informative.
 
With my very best wishes,
 
Ayman El-Mohandes, MBBCh, MD, MPH
Dean

 

Rss

New York City officials are on alert as six neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens are experiencing a significant uptick in COVID-19 cases — just as leaders around the world are beginning to see signs of a potential second wave. Four of those neighborhoods account for one in five cases citywide since the weekend. The increase in the number of positives...

Rss

Gil Addo

Gil Addo

In an open letter on RubiconMD, CUNY SPH Foundation Board Member Gil Addo breaks down why telehealth, now a cornerstone of our nation’s COVID-19 response arsenal, leaves Black and Brown communities behind.

Addo is founder and CEO of RubiconMD.

An Open Letter: Can Telehealth be Saved from Systemic Racism?

By Gil Addo
September 10, 2020

All,

My name is Gil Addo. In 2013, I co-founded RubiconMD, a telehealth company that connects primary care clinicians and specialists through a virtual platform. Over the past 6 months, we have been on the frontlines of the healthcare industry’s massive virtual shift. Telehealth has received both bipartisan praise and a flood of Wall Street attention for its role in triaging COVID-19 patients, and in keeping other patients out of overburdened care settings. Physicians on our platform have reported up to 4,000% increases in patient virtual visits through the early months of the pandemic. Despite this boom, telehealth’s full potential is being significantly curtailed by the same forces of systemic racism that compromise our current healthcare system. I write today in hopes that together we can change that.

Alongside COVID-19, America has been slowly acknowledging the public health crisis of racial injustice. Prior to COVID, structural racism has had a devastating impact on healthcare, education, employment, housing, and infrastructure in Black and Brown communities. Health outcomes have lagged commensurately and dramatically. This is the house that COVID-19 entered. A house poorly equipped, staffed and supported for routine healthcare. Telehealth doesn’t fix the larger problem. Layered on top of our existing inadequate system, telehealth exacerbates the problem. Only investment to combat the underlying system will allow telehealth to reach its true potential of enhanced access to care.

COVID-19 has and will continue to disproportionately sicken and kill Black and Brown communities. Black people are 2.4x more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people, and Hispanic and Latinx people are 1.5x more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people1. Our healthcare system guarantees this. Moreover, the lack of a coordinated national response has only further condemned these vulnerable populations. The virus and its complications will continue to drain the resources of these underserved communities long into the future. Telehealth, now a cornerstone of our nation’s response arsenal, again leaves these communities behind.

Communities of color and low-income households are frequently confronted by a digital divide with inadequate access to computers, high-bandwidth internet, and remote monitoring devices. While 64% of households with an annual income of $100,000 or greater have access to a smartphone, desktop or laptop computer, broadband internet, and a tablet, only 18% of households making less than $30,000 have the same access2. Individuals in these communities are also less likely to have secure patient-provider relationships, again weakening the fundamentals of the existing healthcare system and the potential for telemedicine. Finally, we continue to see fewer resources allocated to the community health centers and safety net hospitals which support our Medicaid populations, particularly in rural communities. This includes a continued underinvestment in technology.

And this is all just what we think we know. Given the omission of these communities in much of scientific research, and the understandable reluctance of minorities in America to contribute health data, it is without a doubt that the challenges are even greater than we fully understand.

The solution must then be multipronged. First, there must be an awareness, understanding and acceptance that systemic racism has massively contributed to the chronic underinvestment in the healthcare system of our communities of color. Building on that common understanding, national and local plans must be developed, tested and scaled to comprehensively address deficiencies and gaps. Notably, investment should address fundamental gaps in the digital divide and infrastructure to support our community and safety net health system. But telehealth leaders cannot sit idly by waiting for broad infrastructure changes to come to fruition. As an industry, we must develop programs and services which affirmatively combat structural racism and ensure equitable access.

As the old saying goes, the best way to get out of a hole is to stop digging. We are in a hole. It will take courage and leadership to get out of it. Leadership will need to address difficult issues of race and injustice. Only then can we get to understanding, agreement, acceptance and broadly supported corrective actions. We know this change will take time. As we kick the movement off today, all I ask is that you take the first step. Join us by clicking below to express your personal commitment to being part of the solution.

Telehealth has tremendous potential. Together, we can realize that potential. We have so much to gain! Thank you.

In hope,

Gil Addo

Rss

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Monday he is extending the state’s moratorium on COVID-related commercial evictions and foreclosures an additional month. The extension will be in place until Oct. 20, according to the state. The moratorium extends protections that are already in place for commercial tenants and mortgagors related to the financial toll seen by business owners as a result of...

Rss

For the second year in a row, Niche.com has ranked Kingsborough Community College the number two community college in New York.

Brooklyn, NY – For the second year in a row, Niche.com has ranked Kingsborough Community College (KCC) the number two community college in New York. The 2021 Best Community Colleges in New York ranking is based on analysis of academic, financial, and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education, along with reviews from students and alumni. KCC was also ranked #115 of 853 community colleges in the nation.

Kingsborough is joined by The City University of New York’s (CUNY) other five community colleges: All placed in the top 10 in New York, with Guttman Community College, ranked number one.

The College received high marks for its student life programs, diversity, location, and faculty. One student reviewer wrote: “Kingsborough Community College allowed me to see my full potential and crave for more knowledge. Before entering KCC, I didn’t really care too much about my education. But the environment and loving professors motivated me to further my education. I met professors that motivated me…to the point that failure is no longer an option. I love the school. The diversity, teaching and environment is such a breath of fresh air than many other colleges. I really recommend the college for students willing to learn.”

“Our motto is ‘dreams begin here’ – and we do all we can to help our students realize their dreams,” noted KCC President Claudia Schrader. “Our priority is student success. Our dedicated team of faculty and staff strive to meet students where they are and help them gain the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in whatever they do. The student and alumni reviews acknowledge that we are successfully serving our students.”

Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified six consecutive times as a Top Community College in the Nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

<U>About Kingsborough Community College</U>
Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community. Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. The College serves approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program.

###

CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

Rss

Demonstrators have been arrested in New York City’s Times Square while protesting federal immigration officials and city police

Rss

Campus diversity earns CCNY a top spot on the latest Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education Best College Rankings.

Scoring high on campus diversity, The City College of New York places eighth out of the top 797 schools nationally for Environment in the 2021 Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education Best College Rankings. The category reflects four elements that are fortes for an institution with a student body representing more than 150 nationalities.

Following is a breakdown of the WSJ/THE Environment scoring for CCNY.

  • Student diversity, 94.5 points;
  • Faculty diversity, 92.9;
  • Student inclusion, 91.6;
  • International students, 59.7.

CCNY placed in the first decile for Environment and #8 nationally. In other pillars, CCNY scored 75.5 points for Engagement.

Overall, City College was ranked #88 out of 257 institutions in the Northeast region and joint 229 out of 797 schools nationwide. Click here to read the methodology.

About the Rankings
The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings is a pioneering ranking of U.S. colleges and universities that puts student success and learning – based on 100,000 current student voices – at its heart. Developed in partnership with US experts and universities, the ranking captures four key areas of performance: the resources available to support education at an institution, the ability of degree programs and teaching to stimulate learning; the diversity and inclusiveness of a college environment, and the propensity of an institution to contribute to students’ success.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:  jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

Rss

More than 1,000 New Yorkers tested positive for COVID-19 in a single day Friday, marking the first time since June 5 the state has seen a daily number that high

Rss

Art historian Dr. Midori Yamamura

Brooklyn, NY – Kingsborough Community College (KCC) has issued an invitation for proposals for UnHomeless NYC, an art exhibition scheduled to take place at the Kingsborough Art Museum in the fall of 2021. The organizers encourage participants to consider the causes of homelessness and their vision to end it. They hope the works will engage students beyond the traditional confines of the museum walls. The title was suggested by a KCC alum, who felt a new word was needed to describe the process of moving from being homeless to having a home.

The project is the brainchild of art historian Dr. Midori Yamamura and photographer Tommy Mintz, assistant professors in the art department at Kingsborough Community College. Mintz invited Queens College Professor Emerita Maureen Conner to assist organizing the artist roster.

“I’ve been interested in homeless issues for a while,” said Yamamura. “Homelessness is not a choice. Most cases are caused by the society.”

During a visit to Grand Central Station, she’d noticed that the space lacked empathy to the many homeless people who considered it a safe place to rest. “I want to change people’s way of thinking about others and urban space.” She shared her thoughts with colleagues at Kingsborough Community College.

“The idea for this project grew from our discussions with other junior professors at the College, including communications professor Laura Spinu, and political science professor Jason Leggett,” added Yamamura. “Throughout last semester, we worked as a group and invited people from the community, including formerly homeless activists, an advocacy organization, three artists, and other educators.”

“What interested me in Midori’s project is the idea that art can create spaces for discussions of commonly held ideas that are difficult to approach,” noted Mintz. “Homelessness is a society-created experience, and therefore changeable by society. Through discussing this issue at all levels — beginning with students — we can understand how to make new decisions about equitable land use.”

The group is also working with other CUNY colleges to explore how humanities programs, like the arts, can provide more meaningful experiences for students.  Yamamura plans to implement the project in her Global Contemporary Art class this semester.

 

Student, graduate, and working artists are invited to submit proposals for the UnHomeless NYC exhibition by October 14, 2020. The exhibition is scheduled for next fall. Please include your contact information, a 500-word description, up to 3 sketches, a list of needed materials, a rough budget, and 1–3 examples of past work. Questions can be directed to thomas.mintz@kbcc.cuny.edu and midori.yamamura@kbcc.cuny.edu.

 

About Kingsborough Community College

Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top 10 Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

 

###

Rss

Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, University of California Regent Richard Blum, has been named by the state auditor’s office as one of the regents involved in an admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of students as favors to well-connected people

Rss

CUNY SPH Annual Report_2020 coverDear Colleagues,
 
I am delighted to share with you the online version of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy Annual Report for 2019-2020.
 
Despite the challenges that the past year brought, CUNY SPH faculty, students, and staff worked together to make it one of our most successful ever.
 
I invite you to peruse the report and read about the advances we have achieved with regard to increased enrollment, expanded curriculum, student support, and research productivity.
 
I hope you find it both interesting and informative.
 
With my very best wishes,
 
Ayman El-Mohandes, MBBCh, MD, MPH
Dean

 

Rss

New York City officials are on alert as six neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens are experiencing a significant uptick in COVID-19 cases — just as leaders around the world are beginning to see signs of a potential second wave. Four of those neighborhoods account for one in five cases citywide since the weekend. The increase in the number of positives...

Rss

Gil Addo

Gil Addo

In an open letter on RubiconMD, CUNY SPH Foundation Board Member Gil Addo breaks down why telehealth, now a cornerstone of our nation’s COVID-19 response arsenal, leaves Black and Brown communities behind.

Addo is founder and CEO of RubiconMD.

An Open Letter: Can Telehealth be Saved from Systemic Racism?

By Gil Addo
September 10, 2020

All,

My name is Gil Addo. In 2013, I co-founded RubiconMD, a telehealth company that connects primary care clinicians and specialists through a virtual platform. Over the past 6 months, we have been on the frontlines of the healthcare industry’s massive virtual shift. Telehealth has received both bipartisan praise and a flood of Wall Street attention for its role in triaging COVID-19 patients, and in keeping other patients out of overburdened care settings. Physicians on our platform have reported up to 4,000% increases in patient virtual visits through the early months of the pandemic. Despite this boom, telehealth’s full potential is being significantly curtailed by the same forces of systemic racism that compromise our current healthcare system. I write today in hopes that together we can change that.

Alongside COVID-19, America has been slowly acknowledging the public health crisis of racial injustice. Prior to COVID, structural racism has had a devastating impact on healthcare, education, employment, housing, and infrastructure in Black and Brown communities. Health outcomes have lagged commensurately and dramatically. This is the house that COVID-19 entered. A house poorly equipped, staffed and supported for routine healthcare. Telehealth doesn’t fix the larger problem. Layered on top of our existing inadequate system, telehealth exacerbates the problem. Only investment to combat the underlying system will allow telehealth to reach its true potential of enhanced access to care.

COVID-19 has and will continue to disproportionately sicken and kill Black and Brown communities. Black people are 2.4x more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people, and Hispanic and Latinx people are 1.5x more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people1. Our healthcare system guarantees this. Moreover, the lack of a coordinated national response has only further condemned these vulnerable populations. The virus and its complications will continue to drain the resources of these underserved communities long into the future. Telehealth, now a cornerstone of our nation’s response arsenal, again leaves these communities behind.

Communities of color and low-income households are frequently confronted by a digital divide with inadequate access to computers, high-bandwidth internet, and remote monitoring devices. While 64% of households with an annual income of $100,000 or greater have access to a smartphone, desktop or laptop computer, broadband internet, and a tablet, only 18% of households making less than $30,000 have the same access2. Individuals in these communities are also less likely to have secure patient-provider relationships, again weakening the fundamentals of the existing healthcare system and the potential for telemedicine. Finally, we continue to see fewer resources allocated to the community health centers and safety net hospitals which support our Medicaid populations, particularly in rural communities. This includes a continued underinvestment in technology.

And this is all just what we think we know. Given the omission of these communities in much of scientific research, and the understandable reluctance of minorities in America to contribute health data, it is without a doubt that the challenges are even greater than we fully understand.

The solution must then be multipronged. First, there must be an awareness, understanding and acceptance that systemic racism has massively contributed to the chronic underinvestment in the healthcare system of our communities of color. Building on that common understanding, national and local plans must be developed, tested and scaled to comprehensively address deficiencies and gaps. Notably, investment should address fundamental gaps in the digital divide and infrastructure to support our community and safety net health system. But telehealth leaders cannot sit idly by waiting for broad infrastructure changes to come to fruition. As an industry, we must develop programs and services which affirmatively combat structural racism and ensure equitable access.

As the old saying goes, the best way to get out of a hole is to stop digging. We are in a hole. It will take courage and leadership to get out of it. Leadership will need to address difficult issues of race and injustice. Only then can we get to understanding, agreement, acceptance and broadly supported corrective actions. We know this change will take time. As we kick the movement off today, all I ask is that you take the first step. Join us by clicking below to express your personal commitment to being part of the solution.

Telehealth has tremendous potential. Together, we can realize that potential. We have so much to gain! Thank you.

In hope,

Gil Addo

Rss

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Monday he is extending the state’s moratorium on COVID-related commercial evictions and foreclosures an additional month. The extension will be in place until Oct. 20, according to the state. The moratorium extends protections that are already in place for commercial tenants and mortgagors related to the financial toll seen by business owners as a result of...

Rss

For the second year in a row, Niche.com has ranked Kingsborough Community College the number two community college in New York.

Brooklyn, NY – For the second year in a row, Niche.com has ranked Kingsborough Community College (KCC) the number two community college in New York. The 2021 Best Community Colleges in New York ranking is based on analysis of academic, financial, and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education, along with reviews from students and alumni. KCC was also ranked #115 of 853 community colleges in the nation.

Kingsborough is joined by The City University of New York’s (CUNY) other five community colleges: All placed in the top 10 in New York, with Guttman Community College, ranked number one.

The College received high marks for its student life programs, diversity, location, and faculty. One student reviewer wrote: “Kingsborough Community College allowed me to see my full potential and crave for more knowledge. Before entering KCC, I didn’t really care too much about my education. But the environment and loving professors motivated me to further my education. I met professors that motivated me…to the point that failure is no longer an option. I love the school. The diversity, teaching and environment is such a breath of fresh air than many other colleges. I really recommend the college for students willing to learn.”

“Our motto is ‘dreams begin here’ – and we do all we can to help our students realize their dreams,” noted KCC President Claudia Schrader. “Our priority is student success. Our dedicated team of faculty and staff strive to meet students where they are and help them gain the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in whatever they do. The student and alumni reviews acknowledge that we are successfully serving our students.”

Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified six consecutive times as a Top Community College in the Nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

<U>About Kingsborough Community College</U>
Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community. Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. The College serves approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program.

###

CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

Rss

Demonstrators have been arrested in New York City’s Times Square while protesting federal immigration officials and city police

Rss

Campus diversity earns CCNY a top spot on the latest Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education Best College Rankings.

Scoring high on campus diversity, The City College of New York places eighth out of the top 797 schools nationally for Environment in the 2021 Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education Best College Rankings. The category reflects four elements that are fortes for an institution with a student body representing more than 150 nationalities.

Following is a breakdown of the WSJ/THE Environment scoring for CCNY.

  • Student diversity, 94.5 points;
  • Faculty diversity, 92.9;
  • Student inclusion, 91.6;
  • International students, 59.7.

CCNY placed in the first decile for Environment and #8 nationally. In other pillars, CCNY scored 75.5 points for Engagement.

Overall, City College was ranked #88 out of 257 institutions in the Northeast region and joint 229 out of 797 schools nationwide. Click here to read the methodology.

About the Rankings
The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings is a pioneering ranking of U.S. colleges and universities that puts student success and learning – based on 100,000 current student voices – at its heart. Developed in partnership with US experts and universities, the ranking captures four key areas of performance: the resources available to support education at an institution, the ability of degree programs and teaching to stimulate learning; the diversity and inclusiveness of a college environment, and the propensity of an institution to contribute to students’ success.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:  jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.