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The FBI said that in the days following the Jan. 6 siege at the Capitol, the Dutchess County man posted a picture showing him inside Statuary Hall and writing that he did "storm the Capitol" and made it inside

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Portrait of KCC Professor Jacqueline ScerbinskiBROOKLYN, NY – As spring blooms in earnest, Jacqueline Scerbinski shared highlights of how the pandemic has affected spring fashions at a recent talk at the Southampton History Museum. A professor of fashion and marketing in the Business of Fashion program at Kingsborough Community College, Scerbinski has had her eye trained on fashion trends for decades.

She is a former retail executive for both Associated Merchandising Corporation and May Department Stores, where she was a corporate buyer covering markets in the U.S. and the Far East. After leaving the retail industry, she worked in the manufacturing sector as the national sales manager and stylist for a branded intimate apparel line. She brings her extensive industry background to the classroom.

“The past teaches us that times of great trauma can produce moments of great creativity,” said Scerbinski. “We’ve been through a lot of traumas over the past many years – great wars, recessions, and pandemics.”

She shared that after the 14th century bubonic plague, we saw more body-conscious dressing, plunging decolletage (necklines) and lavish adornments. In 1947, right after the second World War, Christian Dior announced his new look: a symbol of regeneration with full skirts and fashion details that became the boom we saw in the 1950’s. And, after the oil crisis in the 1970’s, we saw a burst of color.

“Color is very important,” she explained. “It’s one of the first things we forecast out, before we get to fabric, silhouette or style, or anything.” This past winter featured very neutral and muted colors: a reflection of how people were feeling in the midst of the pandemic.

Pantone, the industry’s color standard, chose two extremes for 2021 to represent our gradual emergence from the pandemic: Pantone 13-0647 – Illuminating (yellow) and Pantone 17-5104 – Ultimate Grey. “The yellow demonstrates our hope for a better future today, while the grey shows the somber undertones of what we’re living through,” she said. At the same time, men will be wearing very vibrant colors.

There are other trends afoot.

As TV ads have teased, with the prominence of Zoom, many opted to look professional on top, while wearing sweats or pj’s (or sometimes less) on the bottom. April clothing sales were down 79% but sweatpants and leggings were up 80%.

“We were more concerned with feeling comfortable and not necessarily highlighting our bodies,” she explained. Sweaters became big sellers, with women embracing all-in-one oversized, elongated sweater dresses and turtlenecks: things that were easy to wear.

There has also been an uptick in sleepwear sales: “After the world hit a pause last March, people were home more and wanted to look nice. There were trends in buying a good-looking pair of pajamas rather than putting together something you had at home.” Today, it’s not unusual to find people wearing expensive – but comfortable – pj’s outside of their homes.

In addition to being vital to our health, masks have also become a fashion accessory. “You’ve begun seeing masks for every person and lifestyle on the runway, and some can be quite expensive, with matching fabrics used from high-end to less expensive brands.”

There’s a new focus on the eyes because of masks: Lipstick sales are down 15% but eye makeup is up 204%. (And false eyelashes are up 15%.)

Eyeglasses are also trending, with people who don’t need them for everyday use buying fashionable ones to match their outfits.

Even footwear has become relaxed: “Crocs have made a comeback, with both men and women. And you’re finding plain white sneakers, even in the couture market.”

Because of the economic impact of the pandemic, we’re reaching back in time. “We still want newness, but it feels inappropriate,” remarked Scerbinski. “We’re recognizing that timeless fashion holds its value and can be re-worn.” The resale of vintage and thrift goods is expected to rise from $28 billion a year to $64 billion by 2024.

Consumers are also going into their closets and doing a “fashion diet”: Rather than buying new outfits, they are mixing and matching outfits from what they already own. “The idea of a ‘capsule wardrobe’ is not a new concept. Most savvy women do this anyway. When Donna Karan came out with her line of “seven easy pieces” in the 80s, she said all you need are these seven pieces to mix & match and look good.”

Many companies are struggling to survive the pandemic economy and looking for new ways to survive. To stay afloat, brands and manufacturers are proposing later deliveries, meaning that new merchandise will be delivered closer to the season consumers will wear them, and fewer collections being brought to market.

To stay relevant, they are also finding creative ways to promote their products online, including virtual fitting rooms.

What’s possible after this pandemic? Is there still going to be an office dress code — perhaps one for Zoom calls?

After months of sweatpants and “Zoom sweaters,” Scerbinski doesn’t see us about to let go of comfort that fast. “Spring wear will be comfortable and casual, with not a lot of tailoring,” she noted. “Watch for “cozy” clothes including elastic waistbands, t-shirts, and loosely fitted, androgynous separates.”

To hear Prof. Scerbinski’s complete talk, visit https://youtu.be/hKj8yz5J4Ic.

To learn more about the Business of Fashion program at Kingsborough Community College, visit www.kbcc.cuny.edu.

 

About Kingsborough Community College
Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 10,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program six consecutive times.

###

CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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Police say a Long Island high school math teacher has been arrested for having a sexual relationship with a student

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Vartan Gregorian (1934-2021)

The City College of New York is mourning Vartan Gregorian, a distinguished member of the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership Board of Visitors, noted scholar, philanthropic leader, and president of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He died last Thursday aged 87.

“Vartan Gregorian was the consummate humanitarian and a great friend to the College,” said City College President Vincent Boudreau. “His staunch advocacy for the rights and interests of immigrants in society, in particular, struck a strong and resonant chord with our own mission.”

Of Gregorian’s support for the Colin Powell School, Boudreau said: “From the outset, he lent his wise counsel and great experience to the Colin Powell Center’s Advisory Council and continued on as a cherished member of the Colin Powell School’s Board of Visitors.  We will all miss him dearly and treasure the legacy of the time he spent with us.”

Gen. Colin L. Powell, USA (ret.), a 1958 CCNY alumnus, remembered Gregorian fondly. “Vartan Gregorian was a very dear friend of mine. I had known him for decades. He always shared a smile and a warm story.  He was so proud of his immigrant background, but even prouder of his American citizenship.

When we formed the Powell School at CCNY, I immediately called Vartan and asked him to serve on our board of visitors. He agreed and was a devoted member. We will never forget his charming presence and his devotion to the school.  I will never forget this dear person. Nor will the school.”

Colin Powell School Dean Andrew Rich hailed Gregorian, a long-time member of the School’s Board of Visitors, as “a luminary in the philanthropic world, with an unmatched intellect, a dedication to social change, and a deeply held commitment for bettering the lives of young people, not least those who shared his experience as immigrants.

“Most recently, he was one of the first to step up with emergency aid for our students during this pandemic, giving both personally and through the Carnegie Corporation. As Dean of the Colin Powell School, I have benefited enormously from his mentorship. We will miss his creativity, wisdom, and kindness.”

Gregorian was the 12th president of Carnegie Corporation of New York, a grant-making institution founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1911. During his tenure at the Corporation, Gregorian championed the causes of education and world peace, key concerns of Andrew Carnegie.

Prior to leading Carnegie, Gregorian served for nine years as the 16th president of Brown University.

He was born in Tabriz, Iran, of Armenian parents, receiving his elementary education in Iran and his secondary education in Lebanon. In 1956 he entered Stanford University, where he majored in history and the humanities, graduating with honors in 1958. He was awarded a PhD in history and humanities from Stanford in 1964.

Gregorian taught European and Middle Eastern history at San Francisco State College, the University of California at Los Angeles, and the University of Texas at Austin. In 1972 he joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty and was appointed Tarzian Professor of History and professor of South Asian history. He was founding dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania in 1974 and four years later became its twenty-third provost until 1981.

For eight years (1981-1989), Gregorian served as a president of the New York Public Library, an institution with a network of four research libraries and eighty-three circulating libraries. He was appointed president of Brown University in 1989.

Gregorian was recipient of numerous honors. He received the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civil award, from President Bush in 2004. He’d been awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Clinton in 1998.

Gregorian was the author of “The Road To Home: My Life And Times;” “Islam: A Mosaic, Not A Monolith;” and “The Emergence of Modern Afghanistan, 1880-1946.”

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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A traffic stop in Brooklyn turned violent Saturday morning when a driver pulled over for running a red light hurled a Molotov cocktail at police, the NYPD said.

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April is National Financial Literacy Month, a nationwide campaign designated by Congress in 2004 to raise awareness about the importance of financial literacy and to teach citizens how to establish and maintain healthy financial habits. In recognition of this observance, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is pleased to host a series of financial literacy webinars and to showcase an important financial literacy training program offered by the School.

“Financial planning and budgeting are essential skills that nearly all of us can stand to develop more, and National Financial Literacy Month offers a chance to remind us about the importance of money management and to take the time to build our own financial muscle,” said Jennifer Grace Lee, associate dean of enrollment management and student services at CUNY SPS. “With that in mind, CUNY SPS has designed a two-part financial webinar series that will help students plan out and meet their short- and long-term financial goals. It’s a great opportunity to learn how to use your money wisely and I encourage all to attend.”

Throughout April, the offices of Financial Aid, Bursar, and Scholarships will collaborate to offer a series of financial literacy webinars. These webinars will feature presentations and conversations on savings, budgeting, getting out of debt, and debt management options.

On April 21, the financial literacy series will launch with the Personal Finance Essentials webinar. Key topics covered will include an introduction to budgeting, savings and planning for the future, bank account options, credit and debt, as well as strategies for managing debt.

On April 28, the offices will host the follow-up webinar Building a Budget, which will expand upon important money management topics discussed during the first event. Attendees will hear more about budgeting tools and methods, get familiarized with some important terms to know, and learn how to identify their own budget trends. At both sessions, attendees will also receive financial tips, resources, and tools, and join a Q&A session with the presenters.

All CUNY SPS students, faculty, staff, and alumni are invited to take part. For more information or to register, visit the Financial Literacy Month Events page.

National Financial Literacy Month also offers the opportunity for CUNY SPS to spotlight its Financial Independence Now (DHS FIN) program, a financial literacy training course developed as part of the School’s partnership with NYC’s Department of Homeless Services. This program is one of many workforce development opportunities offered through the Office of Professional Education and Workplace Learning (PEWL), a division of CUNY SPS that administers certificate programs and courses and creates customized workplace learning programs to help people advance their careers and help organizations improve their effectiveness.

In 2016, New York City Mayor de Blasio conducted a 90-day review of homeless shelters and determined that New Yorkers in shelters needed to strengthen their financial literacy skills. Based on these findings, the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) began working with PEWL in 2018 to develop an adult financial literacy learning program for both shelter case managers and directors.

PEWL engaged Change Machine (formerly The Financial Clinic), a national nonprofit that could provide direct knowledge of and hands-on experience with financial coaching since they staff several of city’s financial empowerment centers across the five boroughs. Together, they developed DHS FIN a two-day course to train DHS shelter case managers on how to provide basic financial coaching to shelter clients, as well as a one-day course for shelter directors and program administrators on how to lead implementation of financial coaching strategies within their shelters.

Through these DHS FIN courses, the shelter case managers and directors learn best ways to help their clients create a savings plan, pull credit reports, figure out credit scores, and make a plan for debt management and set goals, using a body of coursework that past attendees have found immensely effective.

“This program is enormously helpful and gave me so many new tools to work with,” said Latoya Moore, housing specialist at CAMBA’s Flagstone Family Residence. “Having this training allows us to help clients with a financial action plan and find out their goals. If they don’t have financial security, they can’t keep their housing. It’s great to be able to help them with this.”

Since the program’s launch in 2018, PEWL and DHS had delivered financial literacy classes to 401 staff members at the CUNY SPS campus, with plans to continue offering the DHS FIN course to additional staff from approximately 150 shelters in the next three years.

Like other programs, DHS FIN had to pivot online following the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020. With support from Change Machine, PEWL and DHS were able to quickly convert the two DHS FIN classroom-based courses for shelter leader and case managers into blended online learning courses, with a goal of delivering them in an engaging way so it would still be informative and interactive for the hundreds of DHS staff enrolled in them.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

For over 15 years, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has been leading online education in New York. Notable for offering the most online bachelor’s and master’s degree options at the City University of New York, and for serving transfer students as the University system’s only undergraduate all-transfer college, CUNY SPS meets the needs of adults who wish to finish a bachelor’s degree, progress from an associate’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, and advance in the workplace or change careers.

The School’s growth has been remarkable, with twenty-four degrees launched since 2006. Enrollment has risen by more than 30% in the last four years to over 4,000 students in the credit-bearing programs.  Thousands more are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workplace learning programs. In addition, the School has an active alumni network and has established the CUNY SPS Foundation, which offers multiple scholarship opportunities to current students.

CUNY SPS has consistently been named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the country’s top online institutions. This year, the School was ranked in the top 2% in the nation on the publisher’s list of the 2021 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.

Press Contact
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu

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A memorial is being planned to remember the life of rapper DMX at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn next weekend, a source familiar with the plan tells News 4.

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Professor and Department Chair Patricia Mathews with work study student in Ethnic and Race Studies Department office.
Ethnic and Race Studies Department Chair Patricia Mathews with work study student at BMCC.

 

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Center for Ethnic Studies has led the way to the creation of a new department, the Department of Ethnic and Race Studies, which offers an Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree in Ethnic Studies.

The mission of the new department is to highlight universal human values that lead to positive change.

Graduates of the program will gain core competencies in the social sciences, arts and humanities. They will learn research methodologies and critical thinking skills as they examine the histories and formation of racial and ethnic groups in the United States and globally.

New department supports students’ growth as agents of change in a multi-ethnic society

Through BMCCarticulation agreement with Lehman College, CUNY, Ethnic Studies graduates will be able to transfer seamlessly into Lehman’s Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree programs in Latino Studies or Latin American and Caribbean Studies, without any loss of credits.

The Center for Ethnic Studies, which preceded the Department of Ethnic and Race Studies, was established in 1970 and served BMCC students for more than 50 years.

Patricia Mathews, a professor of anthropology who taught in the former Center for Ethnic Studies as well as in the BMCC department of Social Sciences, is chair of the new Ethnic and Race Studies Department.

The Ethnic Studies courses providerigorous discussion to address the painful history of our country and find ways to fight for a more just society,” says Professor Mathews. The Ethnic and Race Studies faculty are committed to guiding students through this process, and to validate their potential and strength as agents of change in this multi-ethnic society.”

She says students will also analyze the interrelationships among historical background, cultural patterns, artistic expressions and politics.

This will help students achieve a well-rounded understanding of relations between Asian, Asian American, African, African American, Latino/a and indigenous peoples of the United States.

Students apply research methodologies in interdisciplinary courses, to explore a topic in-depth

“The creation of the department is long overdue and necessary, especially during this time of social justice and political upheaval,” says Acting Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Erwin Wong.

He stresses that the BMCC community needs to be made aware of the importance and significance of race, diversity and inclusivity.

“That is the mission of ethnic studies, and it is accomplished through an interdisciplinary approach,” Acting Provost Wong says. “That is who they are and what makes them unique. No other department at BMCC offers courses that are all interdisciplinary. It speaks to BMCC’s leadership in the movement in higher education to globalize curricula. Congratulations to the faculty and staff in Ethnic Studies!”

The Ethnic and Race Studies departmentoffers coursesin Asian and Asian American Studies, Africana, Afro Latin and Latinx Studies, as well as courses such as Introduction to Ethnic Studies, Comparative Studies, Urban Health in Historically underrepresented communities and Research and Writing Methods.

Students will not only learn history and gain vital factual information about events, they will sharpen their scholarly skills as they explore a topic in-depth, engage in independent research, develop their analytic skills, and apply concepts and theories to new cases,” says Professor Mathews.

She adds that students will apply a variety of methodological approaches to doing ethnic studies research, and engage in the pursuit of self-knowledge that is central to self-empowerment.”

For more information on the Ethnic and Race Studies Department, please contact Program Coordinator, Professor Rigoberto Andinoat EthnicStudies@bmcc.cuny.edu

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New Jersey’s unemployment rate fell slightly last month to 7.7%, according to state data released Thursday. The state added 20,800 jobs overall in March, largely in the private sector, according to the state Labor Department. The largest increases were in leisure and hospitality, which gained 5,700 jobs, and education and health services, adding 4,200 jobs. Meanwhile, the construction sector gained...

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This April, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) celebrates CUNY Disability Awareness Month, a University-wide observance that seeks to recognize disability culture and share CUNY’s continued commitment to equal access and engagement of students with disabilities.

To commemorate this month, CUNY schools around the city will be hosting virtual events throughout April. A full list of events across all CUNY campuses, compiled by the CUNY Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives (OSII), are available on the CUNY website.

At CUNY SPS, the disabilities studies programs will be hosting a spring special topics lecture on April 22 entitled From Hope to Expectation: Habilitation & Cochlear Implants in India with Dr. Michele Friedner, a medical anthropologist in the Department of Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago. During the talk, Dr. Friedner will discuss her groundbreaking research on disability and deafness, along with new cochlear implantation programs in India and elsewhere.

“Each spring, the CUNY SPS disability studies program is pleased to present a special lecture exploring different topics within the field of disability studies. This year, we are particularly excited to welcome Dr. Friedner, whose seminal research on deafness has contributed tremendously to disability scholarship,” said Dr. Mariette Bates, academic director of the disability studies programs at CUNY SPS.

Separately, a number of faculty, staff, and alumni hailing from the CUNY SPS’s groundbreaking undergraduate and graduate disabilities studies programs—which are some of the first of their kind in the country—will also be featured in accessibility-related events during CUNY Disability Awareness Month.

At the 12th Annual CUNY Accessibility ConferencePerspectives on Access: Innovations, Lessons Learned, and Moving Forward, a virtual event that brings together hundreds of state and national participants to discuss accessibility, disability services, and disability activism in higher education, CUNY SPS has made a strong showing.

Among students and alumni involved are Leonard Blades, CUNY LEADS Plus Advisor at Queensborough College, and Shivan Mahabir, project manager and assistive technology specialist at CUNY Assistive Technology Services (CATS), who is also the conference organizer. Additionally, several CUNY SPS staff and faculty also served on the conference’s planning committee, including Christopher Leydon, Heather Zeman, Antonia Levy, Raymond Perez, and Chris Fleming.

Other CUNY SPS faculty and staff will present accessibility-themed talks at the fifth biennial CUNY Faculty Diversity and Inclusion ConferenceThe Power of An Antiracist Academy: Reimagining Systems & Structures.

During a session on April 15, Carrie Shockley, director of both the JFK Jr. Institute at CUNY SPS and the Disability Programs at the CUNY Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives, will present latest research about CUNY Unlimited, a credential program which expands access to the college experience for students with intellectual disabilities. On April 16, Sarah Zeller-Berkman, academic director of the CUNY SPS youth studies program and director of The Intergenerational Change Initiative; Matthew Conlin, adjunct lecturer in (and graduate of) the disability studies programs and coordinator; and Chanira Rojas, program coordinator (and also an alum) from the youth studies program, will together discuss ableism and equity in the CUNY SPS youth studies program. 

Outside of these events, the month’s observance provides a chance to showcase some of the CUNY programs, services, and initiatives that demonstrate the university’s ongoing commitment to students with disabilities.

Each CUNY campus has an Office of Disability Services, with staff who are trained to coordinate the provision of reasonable accommodations and support services for students with disabilities. They also provide counseling and referrals, and arrange crucial auxiliary aids and services, including assistive technology services, note takers, readers, sign language interpreter services, distance learning networks, priority registration, and alternative testing arrangements.

For students with disabilities, the support provided by campus offices can be crucial. “I was involved with disability services since coming here to CUNY SPS in fall 2017. With staff assistance, I was able to effectively and quickly be sure that my academic accommodations were met,” said Jill Von Fumetti, a student in the CUNY SPS disability studies BA program.  “The staff was very welcoming to me as a student. They even double checked with me to make sure I had everything I needed to read my material for class.”

Beyond campus-specific services, CUNY also supports a number of disability advocacy offices and organizations, such as the Central Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives (OSII) and the student-run CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities (CCSD). Other programs offered CUNY-wide include Project REACH: Resources and Education on Autism, CUNY LEADS (Linking Employment, Academics, and Disability), CUNY Unlimited, and the CUNY Assistive Technology Services Department (CATS).

Many of these initiatives provide an opportunity for alumni of CUNY SPS disability studies programs, particularly those from the MS in Disability Services in Higher Education, to share their knowledge and expertise with the rest of CUNY.

In one recent example, the CUNY Learning Disabilities Project organized a Distance Learning Toolkit in fall 2020. Developed partly by CUNY SPS alum (and current staff member) Chris Fleming, who worked hand-in-hand with the CUNY Coalition for Student with Disabilities and Charmaine Townsell, University Director of Student Engagement and Inclusion for the Office for Student Inclusive Initiatives, the toolkit contains practical advice, tips, and resources for students engaged in distance learning.

Fleming, who serves as the CUNY Learning Disabilities Project Coordinator in addition to his role at CUNY SPS, described his participation. “My contributions to the toolkit are derived from my three years’ experience providing support to distance learners here at CUNY SPS, and my own personal experience studying at CUNY SPS while earning my MS in Disability Services in Higher Education,” said Fleming. “I know all too well the struggles of finding peace in this hectic city, so I tried to package some of what I learned over the years into this kit.”

The care and commitment to disability culture reflected by CUNY’s programs and staff not only speaks to the high level of service for students with disabilities, but may even inspire some students to seek a career in the field themselves.

“Before coming to CUNY SPS, I was completely unaware that the field of disability studies existed. I was looking for online programs and this seemed to address my desire to help others and to help my community,” said Von Fumetti. “I plan to apply my degree by becoming a professor of disability studies which will involve attending graduate and doctoral schooling. I can make a difference even though my disability is extremely physically limiting. With my education, I can open up the minds of my future students to the world of disability.”

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

For over 15 years, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has been leading online education in New York. Notable for offering the most online bachelor’s and master’s degree options at the City University of New York, and for serving transfer students as the University system’s only undergraduate all-transfer college, CUNY SPS meets the needs of adults who wish to finish a bachelor’s degree, progress from an associate’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, and advance in the workplace or change careers.

The School’s growth has been remarkable, with twenty-four degrees launched since 2006. Enrollment has risen by more than 30% in the last four years to over 4,000 students in the credit-bearing programs.  Thousands more are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workplace learning programs. In addition, the School has an active alumni network and has established the CUNY SPS Foundation, which offers multiple scholarship opportunities to current students.

CUNY SPS has consistently been named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the country’s top online institutions. This year, the School was ranked in the top 2% in the nation on the publisher’s list of the 2021 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.

Press Contact
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu

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The FBI said that in the days following the Jan. 6 siege at the Capitol, the Dutchess County man posted a picture showing him inside Statuary Hall and writing that he did "storm the Capitol" and made it inside

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Portrait of KCC Professor Jacqueline ScerbinskiBROOKLYN, NY – As spring blooms in earnest, Jacqueline Scerbinski shared highlights of how the pandemic has affected spring fashions at a recent talk at the Southampton History Museum. A professor of fashion and marketing in the Business of Fashion program at Kingsborough Community College, Scerbinski has had her eye trained on fashion trends for decades.

She is a former retail executive for both Associated Merchandising Corporation and May Department Stores, where she was a corporate buyer covering markets in the U.S. and the Far East. After leaving the retail industry, she worked in the manufacturing sector as the national sales manager and stylist for a branded intimate apparel line. She brings her extensive industry background to the classroom.

“The past teaches us that times of great trauma can produce moments of great creativity,” said Scerbinski. “We’ve been through a lot of traumas over the past many years – great wars, recessions, and pandemics.”

She shared that after the 14th century bubonic plague, we saw more body-conscious dressing, plunging decolletage (necklines) and lavish adornments. In 1947, right after the second World War, Christian Dior announced his new look: a symbol of regeneration with full skirts and fashion details that became the boom we saw in the 1950’s. And, after the oil crisis in the 1970’s, we saw a burst of color.

“Color is very important,” she explained. “It’s one of the first things we forecast out, before we get to fabric, silhouette or style, or anything.” This past winter featured very neutral and muted colors: a reflection of how people were feeling in the midst of the pandemic.

Pantone, the industry’s color standard, chose two extremes for 2021 to represent our gradual emergence from the pandemic: Pantone 13-0647 – Illuminating (yellow) and Pantone 17-5104 – Ultimate Grey. “The yellow demonstrates our hope for a better future today, while the grey shows the somber undertones of what we’re living through,” she said. At the same time, men will be wearing very vibrant colors.

There are other trends afoot.

As TV ads have teased, with the prominence of Zoom, many opted to look professional on top, while wearing sweats or pj’s (or sometimes less) on the bottom. April clothing sales were down 79% but sweatpants and leggings were up 80%.

“We were more concerned with feeling comfortable and not necessarily highlighting our bodies,” she explained. Sweaters became big sellers, with women embracing all-in-one oversized, elongated sweater dresses and turtlenecks: things that were easy to wear.

There has also been an uptick in sleepwear sales: “After the world hit a pause last March, people were home more and wanted to look nice. There were trends in buying a good-looking pair of pajamas rather than putting together something you had at home.” Today, it’s not unusual to find people wearing expensive – but comfortable – pj’s outside of their homes.

In addition to being vital to our health, masks have also become a fashion accessory. “You’ve begun seeing masks for every person and lifestyle on the runway, and some can be quite expensive, with matching fabrics used from high-end to less expensive brands.”

There’s a new focus on the eyes because of masks: Lipstick sales are down 15% but eye makeup is up 204%. (And false eyelashes are up 15%.)

Eyeglasses are also trending, with people who don’t need them for everyday use buying fashionable ones to match their outfits.

Even footwear has become relaxed: “Crocs have made a comeback, with both men and women. And you’re finding plain white sneakers, even in the couture market.”

Because of the economic impact of the pandemic, we’re reaching back in time. “We still want newness, but it feels inappropriate,” remarked Scerbinski. “We’re recognizing that timeless fashion holds its value and can be re-worn.” The resale of vintage and thrift goods is expected to rise from $28 billion a year to $64 billion by 2024.

Consumers are also going into their closets and doing a “fashion diet”: Rather than buying new outfits, they are mixing and matching outfits from what they already own. “The idea of a ‘capsule wardrobe’ is not a new concept. Most savvy women do this anyway. When Donna Karan came out with her line of “seven easy pieces” in the 80s, she said all you need are these seven pieces to mix & match and look good.”

Many companies are struggling to survive the pandemic economy and looking for new ways to survive. To stay afloat, brands and manufacturers are proposing later deliveries, meaning that new merchandise will be delivered closer to the season consumers will wear them, and fewer collections being brought to market.

To stay relevant, they are also finding creative ways to promote their products online, including virtual fitting rooms.

What’s possible after this pandemic? Is there still going to be an office dress code — perhaps one for Zoom calls?

After months of sweatpants and “Zoom sweaters,” Scerbinski doesn’t see us about to let go of comfort that fast. “Spring wear will be comfortable and casual, with not a lot of tailoring,” she noted. “Watch for “cozy” clothes including elastic waistbands, t-shirts, and loosely fitted, androgynous separates.”

To hear Prof. Scerbinski’s complete talk, visit https://youtu.be/hKj8yz5J4Ic.

To learn more about the Business of Fashion program at Kingsborough Community College, visit www.kbcc.cuny.edu.

 

About Kingsborough Community College
Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 10,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program six consecutive times.

###

CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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Police say a Long Island high school math teacher has been arrested for having a sexual relationship with a student

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Vartan Gregorian (1934-2021)

The City College of New York is mourning Vartan Gregorian, a distinguished member of the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership Board of Visitors, noted scholar, philanthropic leader, and president of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He died last Thursday aged 87.

“Vartan Gregorian was the consummate humanitarian and a great friend to the College,” said City College President Vincent Boudreau. “His staunch advocacy for the rights and interests of immigrants in society, in particular, struck a strong and resonant chord with our own mission.”

Of Gregorian’s support for the Colin Powell School, Boudreau said: “From the outset, he lent his wise counsel and great experience to the Colin Powell Center’s Advisory Council and continued on as a cherished member of the Colin Powell School’s Board of Visitors.  We will all miss him dearly and treasure the legacy of the time he spent with us.”

Gen. Colin L. Powell, USA (ret.), a 1958 CCNY alumnus, remembered Gregorian fondly. “Vartan Gregorian was a very dear friend of mine. I had known him for decades. He always shared a smile and a warm story.  He was so proud of his immigrant background, but even prouder of his American citizenship.

When we formed the Powell School at CCNY, I immediately called Vartan and asked him to serve on our board of visitors. He agreed and was a devoted member. We will never forget his charming presence and his devotion to the school.  I will never forget this dear person. Nor will the school.”

Colin Powell School Dean Andrew Rich hailed Gregorian, a long-time member of the School’s Board of Visitors, as “a luminary in the philanthropic world, with an unmatched intellect, a dedication to social change, and a deeply held commitment for bettering the lives of young people, not least those who shared his experience as immigrants.

“Most recently, he was one of the first to step up with emergency aid for our students during this pandemic, giving both personally and through the Carnegie Corporation. As Dean of the Colin Powell School, I have benefited enormously from his mentorship. We will miss his creativity, wisdom, and kindness.”

Gregorian was the 12th president of Carnegie Corporation of New York, a grant-making institution founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1911. During his tenure at the Corporation, Gregorian championed the causes of education and world peace, key concerns of Andrew Carnegie.

Prior to leading Carnegie, Gregorian served for nine years as the 16th president of Brown University.

He was born in Tabriz, Iran, of Armenian parents, receiving his elementary education in Iran and his secondary education in Lebanon. In 1956 he entered Stanford University, where he majored in history and the humanities, graduating with honors in 1958. He was awarded a PhD in history and humanities from Stanford in 1964.

Gregorian taught European and Middle Eastern history at San Francisco State College, the University of California at Los Angeles, and the University of Texas at Austin. In 1972 he joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty and was appointed Tarzian Professor of History and professor of South Asian history. He was founding dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania in 1974 and four years later became its twenty-third provost until 1981.

For eight years (1981-1989), Gregorian served as a president of the New York Public Library, an institution with a network of four research libraries and eighty-three circulating libraries. He was appointed president of Brown University in 1989.

Gregorian was recipient of numerous honors. He received the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civil award, from President Bush in 2004. He’d been awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Clinton in 1998.

Gregorian was the author of “The Road To Home: My Life And Times;” “Islam: A Mosaic, Not A Monolith;” and “The Emergence of Modern Afghanistan, 1880-1946.”

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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A traffic stop in Brooklyn turned violent Saturday morning when a driver pulled over for running a red light hurled a Molotov cocktail at police, the NYPD said.

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April is National Financial Literacy Month, a nationwide campaign designated by Congress in 2004 to raise awareness about the importance of financial literacy and to teach citizens how to establish and maintain healthy financial habits. In recognition of this observance, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is pleased to host a series of financial literacy webinars and to showcase an important financial literacy training program offered by the School.

“Financial planning and budgeting are essential skills that nearly all of us can stand to develop more, and National Financial Literacy Month offers a chance to remind us about the importance of money management and to take the time to build our own financial muscle,” said Jennifer Grace Lee, associate dean of enrollment management and student services at CUNY SPS. “With that in mind, CUNY SPS has designed a two-part financial webinar series that will help students plan out and meet their short- and long-term financial goals. It’s a great opportunity to learn how to use your money wisely and I encourage all to attend.”

Throughout April, the offices of Financial Aid, Bursar, and Scholarships will collaborate to offer a series of financial literacy webinars. These webinars will feature presentations and conversations on savings, budgeting, getting out of debt, and debt management options.

On April 21, the financial literacy series will launch with the Personal Finance Essentials webinar. Key topics covered will include an introduction to budgeting, savings and planning for the future, bank account options, credit and debt, as well as strategies for managing debt.

On April 28, the offices will host the follow-up webinar Building a Budget, which will expand upon important money management topics discussed during the first event. Attendees will hear more about budgeting tools and methods, get familiarized with some important terms to know, and learn how to identify their own budget trends. At both sessions, attendees will also receive financial tips, resources, and tools, and join a Q&A session with the presenters.

All CUNY SPS students, faculty, staff, and alumni are invited to take part. For more information or to register, visit the Financial Literacy Month Events page.

National Financial Literacy Month also offers the opportunity for CUNY SPS to spotlight its Financial Independence Now (DHS FIN) program, a financial literacy training course developed as part of the School’s partnership with NYC’s Department of Homeless Services. This program is one of many workforce development opportunities offered through the Office of Professional Education and Workplace Learning (PEWL), a division of CUNY SPS that administers certificate programs and courses and creates customized workplace learning programs to help people advance their careers and help organizations improve their effectiveness.

In 2016, New York City Mayor de Blasio conducted a 90-day review of homeless shelters and determined that New Yorkers in shelters needed to strengthen their financial literacy skills. Based on these findings, the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) began working with PEWL in 2018 to develop an adult financial literacy learning program for both shelter case managers and directors.

PEWL engaged Change Machine (formerly The Financial Clinic), a national nonprofit that could provide direct knowledge of and hands-on experience with financial coaching since they staff several of city’s financial empowerment centers across the five boroughs. Together, they developed DHS FIN a two-day course to train DHS shelter case managers on how to provide basic financial coaching to shelter clients, as well as a one-day course for shelter directors and program administrators on how to lead implementation of financial coaching strategies within their shelters.

Through these DHS FIN courses, the shelter case managers and directors learn best ways to help their clients create a savings plan, pull credit reports, figure out credit scores, and make a plan for debt management and set goals, using a body of coursework that past attendees have found immensely effective.

“This program is enormously helpful and gave me so many new tools to work with,” said Latoya Moore, housing specialist at CAMBA’s Flagstone Family Residence. “Having this training allows us to help clients with a financial action plan and find out their goals. If they don’t have financial security, they can’t keep their housing. It’s great to be able to help them with this.”

Since the program’s launch in 2018, PEWL and DHS had delivered financial literacy classes to 401 staff members at the CUNY SPS campus, with plans to continue offering the DHS FIN course to additional staff from approximately 150 shelters in the next three years.

Like other programs, DHS FIN had to pivot online following the COVID-19 shutdown in 2020. With support from Change Machine, PEWL and DHS were able to quickly convert the two DHS FIN classroom-based courses for shelter leader and case managers into blended online learning courses, with a goal of delivering them in an engaging way so it would still be informative and interactive for the hundreds of DHS staff enrolled in them.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

For over 15 years, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has been leading online education in New York. Notable for offering the most online bachelor’s and master’s degree options at the City University of New York, and for serving transfer students as the University system’s only undergraduate all-transfer college, CUNY SPS meets the needs of adults who wish to finish a bachelor’s degree, progress from an associate’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, and advance in the workplace or change careers.

The School’s growth has been remarkable, with twenty-four degrees launched since 2006. Enrollment has risen by more than 30% in the last four years to over 4,000 students in the credit-bearing programs.  Thousands more are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workplace learning programs. In addition, the School has an active alumni network and has established the CUNY SPS Foundation, which offers multiple scholarship opportunities to current students.

CUNY SPS has consistently been named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the country’s top online institutions. This year, the School was ranked in the top 2% in the nation on the publisher’s list of the 2021 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.

Press Contact
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu

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A memorial is being planned to remember the life of rapper DMX at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn next weekend, a source familiar with the plan tells News 4.

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Professor and Department Chair Patricia Mathews with work study student in Ethnic and Race Studies Department office.
Ethnic and Race Studies Department Chair Patricia Mathews with work study student at BMCC.

 

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Center for Ethnic Studies has led the way to the creation of a new department, the Department of Ethnic and Race Studies, which offers an Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree in Ethnic Studies.

The mission of the new department is to highlight universal human values that lead to positive change.

Graduates of the program will gain core competencies in the social sciences, arts and humanities. They will learn research methodologies and critical thinking skills as they examine the histories and formation of racial and ethnic groups in the United States and globally.

New department supports students’ growth as agents of change in a multi-ethnic society

Through BMCCarticulation agreement with Lehman College, CUNY, Ethnic Studies graduates will be able to transfer seamlessly into Lehman’s Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree programs in Latino Studies or Latin American and Caribbean Studies, without any loss of credits.

The Center for Ethnic Studies, which preceded the Department of Ethnic and Race Studies, was established in 1970 and served BMCC students for more than 50 years.

Patricia Mathews, a professor of anthropology who taught in the former Center for Ethnic Studies as well as in the BMCC department of Social Sciences, is chair of the new Ethnic and Race Studies Department.

The Ethnic Studies courses providerigorous discussion to address the painful history of our country and find ways to fight for a more just society,” says Professor Mathews. The Ethnic and Race Studies faculty are committed to guiding students through this process, and to validate their potential and strength as agents of change in this multi-ethnic society.”

She says students will also analyze the interrelationships among historical background, cultural patterns, artistic expressions and politics.

This will help students achieve a well-rounded understanding of relations between Asian, Asian American, African, African American, Latino/a and indigenous peoples of the United States.

Students apply research methodologies in interdisciplinary courses, to explore a topic in-depth

“The creation of the department is long overdue and necessary, especially during this time of social justice and political upheaval,” says Acting Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Erwin Wong.

He stresses that the BMCC community needs to be made aware of the importance and significance of race, diversity and inclusivity.

“That is the mission of ethnic studies, and it is accomplished through an interdisciplinary approach,” Acting Provost Wong says. “That is who they are and what makes them unique. No other department at BMCC offers courses that are all interdisciplinary. It speaks to BMCC’s leadership in the movement in higher education to globalize curricula. Congratulations to the faculty and staff in Ethnic Studies!”

The Ethnic and Race Studies departmentoffers coursesin Asian and Asian American Studies, Africana, Afro Latin and Latinx Studies, as well as courses such as Introduction to Ethnic Studies, Comparative Studies, Urban Health in Historically underrepresented communities and Research and Writing Methods.

Students will not only learn history and gain vital factual information about events, they will sharpen their scholarly skills as they explore a topic in-depth, engage in independent research, develop their analytic skills, and apply concepts and theories to new cases,” says Professor Mathews.

She adds that students will apply a variety of methodological approaches to doing ethnic studies research, and engage in the pursuit of self-knowledge that is central to self-empowerment.”

For more information on the Ethnic and Race Studies Department, please contact Program Coordinator, Professor Rigoberto Andinoat EthnicStudies@bmcc.cuny.edu

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New Jersey’s unemployment rate fell slightly last month to 7.7%, according to state data released Thursday. The state added 20,800 jobs overall in March, largely in the private sector, according to the state Labor Department. The largest increases were in leisure and hospitality, which gained 5,700 jobs, and education and health services, adding 4,200 jobs. Meanwhile, the construction sector gained...

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This April, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) celebrates CUNY Disability Awareness Month, a University-wide observance that seeks to recognize disability culture and share CUNY’s continued commitment to equal access and engagement of students with disabilities.

To commemorate this month, CUNY schools around the city will be hosting virtual events throughout April. A full list of events across all CUNY campuses, compiled by the CUNY Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives (OSII), are available on the CUNY website.

At CUNY SPS, the disabilities studies programs will be hosting a spring special topics lecture on April 22 entitled From Hope to Expectation: Habilitation & Cochlear Implants in India with Dr. Michele Friedner, a medical anthropologist in the Department of Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago. During the talk, Dr. Friedner will discuss her groundbreaking research on disability and deafness, along with new cochlear implantation programs in India and elsewhere.

“Each spring, the CUNY SPS disability studies program is pleased to present a special lecture exploring different topics within the field of disability studies. This year, we are particularly excited to welcome Dr. Friedner, whose seminal research on deafness has contributed tremendously to disability scholarship,” said Dr. Mariette Bates, academic director of the disability studies programs at CUNY SPS.

Separately, a number of faculty, staff, and alumni hailing from the CUNY SPS’s groundbreaking undergraduate and graduate disabilities studies programs—which are some of the first of their kind in the country—will also be featured in accessibility-related events during CUNY Disability Awareness Month.

At the 12th Annual CUNY Accessibility ConferencePerspectives on Access: Innovations, Lessons Learned, and Moving Forward, a virtual event that brings together hundreds of state and national participants to discuss accessibility, disability services, and disability activism in higher education, CUNY SPS has made a strong showing.

Among students and alumni involved are Leonard Blades, CUNY LEADS Plus Advisor at Queensborough College, and Shivan Mahabir, project manager and assistive technology specialist at CUNY Assistive Technology Services (CATS), who is also the conference organizer. Additionally, several CUNY SPS staff and faculty also served on the conference’s planning committee, including Christopher Leydon, Heather Zeman, Antonia Levy, Raymond Perez, and Chris Fleming.

Other CUNY SPS faculty and staff will present accessibility-themed talks at the fifth biennial CUNY Faculty Diversity and Inclusion ConferenceThe Power of An Antiracist Academy: Reimagining Systems & Structures.

During a session on April 15, Carrie Shockley, director of both the JFK Jr. Institute at CUNY SPS and the Disability Programs at the CUNY Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives, will present latest research about CUNY Unlimited, a credential program which expands access to the college experience for students with intellectual disabilities. On April 16, Sarah Zeller-Berkman, academic director of the CUNY SPS youth studies program and director of The Intergenerational Change Initiative; Matthew Conlin, adjunct lecturer in (and graduate of) the disability studies programs and coordinator; and Chanira Rojas, program coordinator (and also an alum) from the youth studies program, will together discuss ableism and equity in the CUNY SPS youth studies program. 

Outside of these events, the month’s observance provides a chance to showcase some of the CUNY programs, services, and initiatives that demonstrate the university’s ongoing commitment to students with disabilities.

Each CUNY campus has an Office of Disability Services, with staff who are trained to coordinate the provision of reasonable accommodations and support services for students with disabilities. They also provide counseling and referrals, and arrange crucial auxiliary aids and services, including assistive technology services, note takers, readers, sign language interpreter services, distance learning networks, priority registration, and alternative testing arrangements.

For students with disabilities, the support provided by campus offices can be crucial. “I was involved with disability services since coming here to CUNY SPS in fall 2017. With staff assistance, I was able to effectively and quickly be sure that my academic accommodations were met,” said Jill Von Fumetti, a student in the CUNY SPS disability studies BA program.  “The staff was very welcoming to me as a student. They even double checked with me to make sure I had everything I needed to read my material for class.”

Beyond campus-specific services, CUNY also supports a number of disability advocacy offices and organizations, such as the Central Office of Student Inclusion Initiatives (OSII) and the student-run CUNY Coalition for Students with Disabilities (CCSD). Other programs offered CUNY-wide include Project REACH: Resources and Education on Autism, CUNY LEADS (Linking Employment, Academics, and Disability), CUNY Unlimited, and the CUNY Assistive Technology Services Department (CATS).

Many of these initiatives provide an opportunity for alumni of CUNY SPS disability studies programs, particularly those from the MS in Disability Services in Higher Education, to share their knowledge and expertise with the rest of CUNY.

In one recent example, the CUNY Learning Disabilities Project organized a Distance Learning Toolkit in fall 2020. Developed partly by CUNY SPS alum (and current staff member) Chris Fleming, who worked hand-in-hand with the CUNY Coalition for Student with Disabilities and Charmaine Townsell, University Director of Student Engagement and Inclusion for the Office for Student Inclusive Initiatives, the toolkit contains practical advice, tips, and resources for students engaged in distance learning.

Fleming, who serves as the CUNY Learning Disabilities Project Coordinator in addition to his role at CUNY SPS, described his participation. “My contributions to the toolkit are derived from my three years’ experience providing support to distance learners here at CUNY SPS, and my own personal experience studying at CUNY SPS while earning my MS in Disability Services in Higher Education,” said Fleming. “I know all too well the struggles of finding peace in this hectic city, so I tried to package some of what I learned over the years into this kit.”

The care and commitment to disability culture reflected by CUNY’s programs and staff not only speaks to the high level of service for students with disabilities, but may even inspire some students to seek a career in the field themselves.

“Before coming to CUNY SPS, I was completely unaware that the field of disability studies existed. I was looking for online programs and this seemed to address my desire to help others and to help my community,” said Von Fumetti. “I plan to apply my degree by becoming a professor of disability studies which will involve attending graduate and doctoral schooling. I can make a difference even though my disability is extremely physically limiting. With my education, I can open up the minds of my future students to the world of disability.”

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

For over 15 years, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has been leading online education in New York. Notable for offering the most online bachelor’s and master’s degree options at the City University of New York, and for serving transfer students as the University system’s only undergraduate all-transfer college, CUNY SPS meets the needs of adults who wish to finish a bachelor’s degree, progress from an associate’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, and advance in the workplace or change careers.

The School’s growth has been remarkable, with twenty-four degrees launched since 2006. Enrollment has risen by more than 30% in the last four years to over 4,000 students in the credit-bearing programs.  Thousands more are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workplace learning programs. In addition, the School has an active alumni network and has established the CUNY SPS Foundation, which offers multiple scholarship opportunities to current students.

CUNY SPS has consistently been named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the country’s top online institutions. This year, the School was ranked in the top 2% in the nation on the publisher’s list of the 2021 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.

Press Contact
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu