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A 12-year-old boy who died after police said he complained of head pain following reports he was punched in the head at school suffered no physical trauma, the medical examiner’s office said Monday. The cause and manner of death for Romy Vilsaint are pending further study, a spokesperson said. The NYPD had said Vilsaint had no clear signs of trauma...

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As we move past the one-year anniversary of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has never been more important to recognize and support nurses for all that they do to help their patients and their communities. This May, CUNY SPS is deeply honored to join with the American Nurses Association (ANA) to pay tribute to our nurses during National Nurses Month and National Nurses Day on May 6.

According to the ANA, the 2021 National Nurses Month theme is “Nurses Make a Difference.” We can see this in the work of CUNY SPS nursing students, faculty, and other nurses who have touched the lives of the CUNY SPS community, particularly over the last year.

For many members of our community, nurses have helped them and their families tremendously during the first few months of the COVID-19 crisis and, in some cases, have made it possible for them to say goodbye:

“His name is Arch Layumas. He’s not a household name or an A-list celebrity, but my family and I will always remember him. 

Arch is a nurse at St. John’s Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway. In a scene that’s been repeated countless heartbreaking times throughout the city, Arch gave us the opportunity to speak with my father-in-law, Charles Neal Sofge Sr., one final time by lending him his phone so that his sons could tell their dad how much he meant to them.

My children and I sat on the couch with tears streaming down our faces. The words stuck in our throats burning with immense sorrow. My husband spoke for all of us and thanked his dad for sharing his love of music with our children. 

We could all hear his dad laboring to speak, the growing lack of oxygen was obvious. Each son took a turn to say they loved him. ‘It’s okay to leave us,’ they told him. 

Neal died three days later due to complications from COVID-19. 

Arch gave us a wonderful gift that sad afternoon. We didn’t get a chance to thank him, but I reached out to him via text and asked if I could share this story. His response filled my eyes with tears again: 

‘It was truly my pleasure to take care of your father-in-law. He was one of my patients who really touched my heart. I was stopping myself from crying while taking care of him. He is one of the kindest persons that I met in my nursing career.’”

—Marisa Osorio, CUNY SPS PEWL Writer

Charles Neal Sofge Sr. with grandchildren
Charles Neal Sofge Sr. with grandchildren

Here at CUNY SPS, many of our nursing students are practicing nurses who, like Arch Layumas, show compassion and kindness towards their patients daily. For them, National Nurses Month is an important time for personal reflection.

This spring, more than 200 students are graduating from CUNY SPS with their bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing. With this milestone just up ahead, several RN to BS in Nursing candidates look back on what led them to become nurses and share what they love about their job.

Nicholas Fosmire, who is also this year’s Petrie Nurse Scholar, describes how other nurses have inspired him.

Giselle Espinal reflects upon what she does to make a difference in the nursing field.

Jan Czarina Javier offers her thoughts on what being a nurse means to her.

 

For other nursing students, the skills they gained have turned out to be transferable to other important community roles.

Phara Souffrant Forrest, who is completing her BS in nursing at CUNY SPS while working as a nurse, is notably juggling one other big job—as a New York State Assembly member for Brooklyn’s District 57. In an interview with CUNY SPS, Forrest credits her nurse training for helping to prepare her for a career in politics.

“Being a nurse teaches you how to think strategically. As a nurse, I learned how to assess patients to determine the severity of their condition and prioritize who’s going to get immediate attention. This training helps me make sense of the many crises we’re dealing with—healthcare workers without protective equipment, police brutality, millions unemployed, and no money for rent. My campaign and my organizing has been so much stronger because of my work as a nurse.”

Phara Souffrant Forest

Phara Souffrant ForrestNicholas, Giselle, Jan, and Phara are just a few of the CUNY SPS nursing students who can speak to the experience of those in their profession. But for them and so many other students—especially for those who are essential workers—the biggest challenge they face right now is still COVID-19.

Our nursing faculty and staff are acutely aware of the many sacrifices our nursing students have made during the pandemic, and try to support them in any way they can. Last spring, the CUNY SPS nursing faculty reached out in a short video to offer their heartfelt thanks, a sentiment echoed this year for all that our nursing students have done and continue to do.

About the CUNY SPS Online Nursing Programs

The CUNY School of Professional Studies offers a portfolio of online degree and advanced certificate programs in nursing in order to help fill the growing void within the healthcare system. Serving as the first fully online nursing degrees in the CUNY system, our programs help nurses advance within their careers while continuing their education in a timely, flexible, and affordable way.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

For over 15 years, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has been leading online education in New York. Notable for offering the most online bachelor’s and master’s degree options at the City University of New York, and for serving transfer students as the University system’s only undergraduate all-transfer college, CUNY SPS meets the needs of adults who wish to finish a bachelor’s degree, progress from an associate’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, and advance in the workplace or change careers.

The School’s growth has been remarkable, with twenty-four degrees launched since 2006. Enrollment has risen by more than 30% in the last four years to over 4,000 students in the credit-bearing programs.  Thousands more are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workplace learning programs. In addition, the School has an active alumni network and has established the CUNY SPS Foundation, which offers multiple scholarship opportunities to current students.

CUNY SPS has consistently been named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the country’s top online institutions. This year, the School was ranked in the top 2% in the nation on the publisher’s list of the 2021 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.

Press Contact
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu

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Joyful reunions among vaccinated parents and children across the country marked this year’s Mother’s Day

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BROOKLYN, NY – The recent COVID pandemic has done much to throw the city’s present and future into question. It especially drew attention to existing forms of socio-economic inequality and systemic problems. To help find ways to make New York City more socially inclusive, Kingsborough Community College (KCC) will present a two-part virtual series titled “The Future of NYC, Post COVID.”

Hosted by KCC’s Department of History, Philosophy and Political Science, the first webinar takes place via Zoom on May 26, 2021 at 3pm. It will offer brief talks by experts from the academic and professional worlds on the subject “Culture and the Everyday,” followed by a Q&A moderated by professors Megan Brandow-Faller and Michael Spear.

The day’s topics include:

COVID-19’S BIOETHICAL CHALLENGES
Michael Barnhart, Professor of Philosophy, Kingsborough Community College/CUNY
COVID-19 has posed its share of bioethical issues. Few of them are new, but some of the more noteworthy include how public health is understood, the limits of private choice, balancing various social needs and public goods, and exacerbation of existing social inequities in medicine, including racism and other forms of discrimination. The talk explores these issues and the prospects for their resolution.

FINDING FASHION IN THE POST-COVID FUTURE
Sonya Abrego, Visiting Assistant Professor, Fordham University, FIT, and Parsons
The pandemic changed global fashion and retail in new and unforeseen ways. It has also shifted how fashion scholars work to understand clothing in and outside of cultural institutions. Will New Yorkers carry pandemic styles into the future or will we see fresh looks and a reevaluation of what it means to get dressed?

WHO STAYS AND WHO GOES? DIVERSITY AND JOB LOSS FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS
Kristin Perkins, Adult Programs Coordinator at the Millbrook Library
Alongside widespread job loss, many cultural institutions responded to the economic devastation of the pandemic with terminations, hiring freezes, or budget shifts to part-time or contract labor. While this impacted all cultural workers, many recent graduates and new professionals have been re-envisioning careers and pivoting to other industries. The pandemic has only served to highlight the precarity in arts labor that already existed, but as class-vulnerable young professionals leave the arts sector, it’s worth examining who stays, who goes, and how arts advocates and industry workers might mitigate the loss of diversity and support young professionals.

THE VIRTUAL MUSEUM? EFFECTS OF THE PANDEMIC ON MUSEUMS AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN NYC
Speaker TBA
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated and exacerbated a number of existing trends in museums and cultural institutions, especially those whose business model is based on maximizing in-person visitation. This talk will draw from the reopening experience of leading NYC museums and cultural institutions to highlight some of the lasting and universal impacts of the pandemic on the museum and cultural sector in NYC.

To join the May 26 webinar, go to https://zoom.us/j/95048557445?pwd=a3QvT2JxSkdGU0ZtSjdrbm9aL2l0UT09, Passcode: 589052.

Part two of “The Future of NYC, Post COVID,” titled “The City’s Economy and Labor Market, Housing, Public Health, and Urban Planning,” will take place in the fall.

About Kingsborough Community College
Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community. Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 10,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program six consecutive times.

###

CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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CNBC's Jim Cramer explains why investors should focus on doing their own homework after earnings reports before selling a stock.

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Matthew Reilly, a groundbreaking CCNY anthropologist, is the recipient of CUNY’s Feliks Gross Award for outstanding Assistant Professors.

Matthew C. Reilly, a pioneering anthropological archaeologist in The City College of New York’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, is a recipient of the 2021 Feliks Gross Award for outstanding Assistant Professors from the City University of New York.

The honor is one of two presented to outstanding assistant professors CUNY-wide by the CUNY Academy for the Humanities and Sciences. The other accolade is the Henry Wasser Award. The Academy selects recipients for the two awards from a large group of highly qualified, academically impressive, assistant professors from all 25 CUNY campuses. Half receive the Gross award and half receive the Wasser award, randomly.

The awards are named after Feliks Gross and Henry Wasser, two of the founders of CUNY Academy for the Humanities and Sciences.

Reilly is assistant professor of anthropology, gender studies, and international studies at City College and affiliated faculty in anthropology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. His archaeological research explores issues of race, colonialism, slavery, and freedom in the Caribbean and West Africa.

In partnership with a visual artist, Reilly’s current project in Barbados explores post-plantation landscapes and heritage. In Liberia, he co-directs the Back-to-Africa Heritage and Archaeology Project, the first archaeological project to explore the 19th century Back-to-Africa movement. In collaboration with Liberian partnering institutions, the project explores sites of settlement and place-making processes through a lens of colonialism, race, and freedom in the post-conflict present. Additionally, he is working on an archival project that investigates the relationship between archaeology and White supremacy as the field took shape in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Reilly is the author of  “Archaeology below the Cliff: Race, Class, and Redlegs in Barbadian Sugar Society,” and co-editor of “Pre-Colonial and Post-Contact Archaeology in Barbados.”

Applauding his award, chair Irina Carlota Silber said Reilly was: “an invaluable member of the department of anthropology, gender studies, and international studies and internationally recognized for his groundbreaking scholarship in historical archaeology, which he leverages to examine critical questions around race, class, and gender in the Atlantic world.

“With specific attention to the Caribbean and the African Diaspora, Matt’s work is also a critical interrogation of Whiteness. Combined with his fluency across the four-fields of anthropology, Matt’s research is key to contributing to our department’s commitment to public scholarship and anti-racist pedagogies.”

Reilly is the second CCNY faculty member to win a Gross or Wasser award this spring. Boukary Sawadogo  of the Division of Humanities and the Arts received the Wasser Award.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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New York City transit workers are once again calling on the city to provide more mental health services after three people halted train services on the same day. Video from the Broad Street subway station shows an emotionally disturbed man who had locked himself inside a train operator’s cab, refusing to open the door for workers and yelling profanity. The...

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Michael Vera, CCNY Class of 2021, is a GEM Fellowship winner.

Already accepted to several top graduate schools including Stanford and Columbia, Michael Vera of The City College of New York’s Class of 2021 is the winner of a highly competitive GEM Fellowship that offers funding for a master’s program in structural engineering at New York University.

GEM fellowships fund master’s and PhDs in engineering for underrepresented students of exceptional quality who intend to work in industry.  Each year, GEM identifies and recruits more than 1,000 undergraduate students, graduate students, and working professionals for admission to advanced degree programs at the nation’s top universities. The National GEM Consortium’s combination of graduate study and field-related internships make GEM fellows more marketable and more competitive upon graduation.

Queens resident Vera is a first-generation college student graduating from City College’s Grove School of Engineering with a BE in civil engineering and numerous honors.

The GEM Fellowship caps an outstanding four years at CCNY for Vera, who worked more than 20 hours a week during his studies. His other national accolades include the National Association of Minority Contractors Scholarship, the Deep Foundation Institute’s Educational Trust Scholarship and the Moles Scholarship.

In addition, Vera, who is graduating magna cum laude and #1 in his class, spent summer 2019 as a Research Fellow at Toyohashi University of Technology, in Toyohashi, Japan. There he participated in research using structural dynamics knowledge to quantify the seismic effect an earthquake acceleration has on different structural models.

Naresh Devineni, associate professor, civil engineering in the Grove School, described Vera’s CCNY experience as an “incredible journey” defined by hard work and success.” He lauded Vera for giving back to CCNY. This includes tutoring SEEK students in math and engineering related courses.

Vera is the third Grove School student to receive a GEM Fellowship in the past three years. Wendy Fernandez was named a Fellow in 2019 and Lizzette Salmeron was a 2020 recipient.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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Planning an outdoor event? Looking for not too hot, not too cold, not too wet weather? Storm Team 4 may be able to help with that. The U.S. government released a massive trove of new climate data this week, setting out 30-year averages for temperatures, precipitation and other factors around the country. Based on that data, here are some dates...

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This article was posted first on HarlemWorldMagazine.com.

Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray today announced Mental Health for All, a new comprehensive plan to deliver universal access to mental health support to all New Yorkers. The plan builds on the work of ThriveNYC and other City agencies and lays out a path to ensure that mental health is a permanent part of City government’s response.

“In New York City, healthcare is not a privilege reserved for those who can afford it. It is a human right for all,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “Mental Health For All is our commitment to every one of the 8.6 million people in our City: we will support you every step of the way in living a happy and healthy life.”

“Every new program from ThriveNYC and City agencies, every expansion of services over the past seven years, is a direct response to what we heard from New Yorkers – who asked for easier access to care, culturally competent counselors who speak their language and more coordination across government and community organizations to solve entrenched problems,” said First Lady Chirlane McCray. “As we emerge from COVID-19, we are building on that foundation. With this executive order and the creation of the Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health, we are ensuring this work will be a lasting contribution to New York City for years to come.”

To address widespread mental health needs, which have deepened during the COVID-19 pandemic, New York City will:

  • Begin universal mental health support at City vaccination sites. As the City vaccinates hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers in the coming weeks at City sites, new Mental Health workers will provide check-ins, mental health support, resources, and connections to care as needed.
  • Create a Community Behavioral Health Academy. Too often, underserved communities don’t have enough behavioral health providers and professionals to support mental health needs. The City will partner with the CUNY School of Professional Studies to create a Community Behavioral Health Academy that will train more than 5,000 City agency staff and social service providers in three years to better support the mental health of the people they serve.
  • Launch a new Mental Health for All website and public education campaign to help New Yorkers navigate all of the mental health resources available to them and find mental health and substance misuse support that meets their needs.

Mayor de Blasio also announced an Executive Order creating a Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health to ensure that mental health for all is a lasting part of City government and a mayoral priority into the future.

The office will be charged with:

  • Overseeing new investments included in the Fiscal Year 2022 Executive budget, including $112M for citywide expansion of mental health teams that will respond to 911 mental health calls and nearly $50M in new services for people with serious mental illness.
  • Managing the $225M in significant community-based mental health services currently supported by ThriveNYC, including services in shelters, Centers for Older Adults, Family Justice Centers, police precincts, and social service agencies.
  • Developing new strategies, such as Communities Thrive, to continue closing gaps in care, providing more support right in communities, and promoting mental health for all.
  • Maximizing promotion of mental health across every part of City government.

Nearly 1.6 million adult New Yorkers experience mental illness every year, and the COVID-19 pandemic has deepened and expanded mental health needs. Prior to the pandemic, approximately 9% of adult New Yorkers experienced symptoms of depression each year. At the height of the pandemic, 44% of adult New Yorkers reported symptoms of anxiety due to COVID-19, 36% reported symptoms of depression, and 35% of adults with children reported that the emotional or behavioral health of a child has been negatively affected. And even before pandemic, New Yorkers of color were at greater risk of mental health challenges yet received less mental health care than white New Yorkers – the pandemic has exposed and exacerbated these disparities.

The Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health will ensure that this commitment remains a lasting part of City government. The new Office will continue ThriveNYC’s practice of regularly publishing a detailed programmatic budget and reach and impact data for each of its programs.

The new Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health builds on the strong foundation of ThriveNYC. Since launching in 2015, ThriveNYC has launched dozens of new programs, implemented by thirteen City agencies and nearly 200 community-based organizations, reaching hundreds of thousands of people every year. For decades, uneven and insufficient federal and state funding for mental health services left hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers without care. ThriveNYC represented the first investment in New York City’s history to close gaps in services, expand where, when and how we deliver mental health support, and work toward a system that reaches all New Yorkers.

“For more than five years, ThriveNYC has added innovative mental health support so more New Yorkers can get the care they need, whenever, wherever, and however they need it,” said Susan Herman, the Director of the Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health. “Building on this strong foundation, the new Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health will continue to invest in community-based strategies that demonstrate the City’s commitment to mental health for all.

“Mental health resources have never been more important or urgent,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Dave A. Chokshi. “We have proven what works and we now have an opportunity to give these services the resources they need to reach all New Yorkers.”

“NYC Health + Hospitals is honored to provide more than 50 percent of the critical mental health care in the City, regardless of ability to pay, immigration status, and other demographics that often make people feel excluded from comprehensive, culturally sensitive care,” said NYC Health + Hospitals President and CEO Mitchell Katz, MD. “Over the years, the City’s public health system has worked tirelessly to ensure that every door remains open for New Yorkers suffering from mental health issues to substance use disorders and more have the affordable access they need to live healthy and full lives. We look forward to continuing this important work with our sister agencies and make sure this crucial work grows and impacts people’s lives.”

“Providing critically needed services to families is part of ACS’ mission in keeping children safe and families supported, and that’s why we are so supportive of the Mental Health for All initiative,” said ACS Commissioner David A. Hansell. “I applaud Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray for this work, which will positively impact the lives of many New Yorkers.”

“The Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity is thrilled to partner with CUNY’s School of Professional Studies to launch the Community Behavioral Health Academy,” said Matthew Klein, Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity. “Community-based organizations have long been on the frontlines of the fight to improve mental health. The Academy builds on NYC Opportunity’s evaluation findings to equip them with the skills and tools they need to help us respond to the lasting impacts of COVID-19 and the long history of structural racism, discrimination, and disinvestment.”

“Our city’s COVID-19 response and recovery is three-fold – mental, physical, and economic. Today’s announcement shifts the focus onto the biggest challenge that we face even prior to the pandemic, ensuring that mental health support is accessible to all New Yorkers – particularly in Black and Brown communities that have been disproportionately affected by violence, health disparities, the loss of loved ones and housing instability. By centralizing mental health resources and providers while creating a pipeline for providers, we are putting our best forward amid a crisis that has taken a devastating toll on New Yorkers of all ages and professions,” said Council Member Farah N. Louis, Chair of the Committee on Mental Health, Disabilities, and Addictions.

“CUNY SPS is very excited to be a part of the development of the Community Behavioral Health Academy,” said John Mogulescu, Dean of the CUNY School of Professional Studies. “Particularly after last year, when COVID-19 stormed the city, the need to provide New Yorkers with mental health support is more critical than ever. What we have endured as a city will be with us for many years and the Academy will serve a major role in helping us to address and recover from this trauma. We are looking forward to collaborating on this important initiative with our partners at the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity.”

“With today’s actions, New York City continues to be at the forefront of integrating mental health into its COVID-19 response and recovery,” said former U.S. Rep. and founder of The Kennedy Forum, Patrick J. Kennedy. “Through their historic investments in mental health, Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray have strengthened the City’s ‘human infrastructure,’ which will benefit New Yorkers for generations to come.”

“Protecting and enhancing mental health is everyone’s interest. For too long, our public officials have been consumed by a focus on expensive, deep-end interventions, forgetting that every “Stage 4” crisis today could have been averted by better interventions long before stage four. Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray are spot on in turning our attention to the importance of mental health for all people at all stages of life, and for working to ensure that every constituent of theirs has an upstream opportunity to access the mental health services and supports they need and want,” said Paul Gionfriddo, President and CEO of Mental Health America.

“Continuing to raise up the importance of mental health and destigmatizing preventative services and treatment is critically important.  Strengthening, adequately resourcing, and integrating the network of providers into these efforts is essential to the success of these vital efforts,” said Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Executive Director, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York.

“New York City does what other governments only talk about. Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray use every opportunity to enhance the mental health of New Yorkers. And now they’re paving the way for the next administration to do the same. They have set the bar high and leave a legacy that we must nurture and build upon,” said Linda Rosenberg MSW, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry.

“The impact of COVID-19 on New York City residents will be felt for years,” said Kimberly Williams, President & CEO of Vibrant Emotional Health. “Providing a coordinated and city-wide effort to strengthen and increase access to mental health supports will help to ensure New Yorkers not only recover, but flourish.”

“The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) applauds the creation of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Mental Health Innovation,” said Daniel H. Gillison Jr, NAMI CEO. “The city is making mental health issues a priority, which shows a lasting commitment to provide mental health for all. The time is now for leaders at all levels – community, state and federal government – to follow the precedent set by New York City to ensure that mental health is front and center in COVID-19 recovery efforts to make it easier for people to find the help they need so no one feels alone in their struggle.”

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A 12-year-old boy who died after police said he complained of head pain following reports he was punched in the head at school suffered no physical trauma, the medical examiner’s office said Monday. The cause and manner of death for Romy Vilsaint are pending further study, a spokesperson said. The NYPD had said Vilsaint had no clear signs of trauma...

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As we move past the one-year anniversary of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has never been more important to recognize and support nurses for all that they do to help their patients and their communities. This May, CUNY SPS is deeply honored to join with the American Nurses Association (ANA) to pay tribute to our nurses during National Nurses Month and National Nurses Day on May 6.

According to the ANA, the 2021 National Nurses Month theme is “Nurses Make a Difference.” We can see this in the work of CUNY SPS nursing students, faculty, and other nurses who have touched the lives of the CUNY SPS community, particularly over the last year.

For many members of our community, nurses have helped them and their families tremendously during the first few months of the COVID-19 crisis and, in some cases, have made it possible for them to say goodbye:

“His name is Arch Layumas. He’s not a household name or an A-list celebrity, but my family and I will always remember him. 

Arch is a nurse at St. John’s Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway. In a scene that’s been repeated countless heartbreaking times throughout the city, Arch gave us the opportunity to speak with my father-in-law, Charles Neal Sofge Sr., one final time by lending him his phone so that his sons could tell their dad how much he meant to them.

My children and I sat on the couch with tears streaming down our faces. The words stuck in our throats burning with immense sorrow. My husband spoke for all of us and thanked his dad for sharing his love of music with our children. 

We could all hear his dad laboring to speak, the growing lack of oxygen was obvious. Each son took a turn to say they loved him. ‘It’s okay to leave us,’ they told him. 

Neal died three days later due to complications from COVID-19. 

Arch gave us a wonderful gift that sad afternoon. We didn’t get a chance to thank him, but I reached out to him via text and asked if I could share this story. His response filled my eyes with tears again: 

‘It was truly my pleasure to take care of your father-in-law. He was one of my patients who really touched my heart. I was stopping myself from crying while taking care of him. He is one of the kindest persons that I met in my nursing career.’”

—Marisa Osorio, CUNY SPS PEWL Writer

Charles Neal Sofge Sr. with grandchildren
Charles Neal Sofge Sr. with grandchildren

Here at CUNY SPS, many of our nursing students are practicing nurses who, like Arch Layumas, show compassion and kindness towards their patients daily. For them, National Nurses Month is an important time for personal reflection.

This spring, more than 200 students are graduating from CUNY SPS with their bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing. With this milestone just up ahead, several RN to BS in Nursing candidates look back on what led them to become nurses and share what they love about their job.

Nicholas Fosmire, who is also this year’s Petrie Nurse Scholar, describes how other nurses have inspired him.

Giselle Espinal reflects upon what she does to make a difference in the nursing field.

Jan Czarina Javier offers her thoughts on what being a nurse means to her.

 

For other nursing students, the skills they gained have turned out to be transferable to other important community roles.

Phara Souffrant Forrest, who is completing her BS in nursing at CUNY SPS while working as a nurse, is notably juggling one other big job—as a New York State Assembly member for Brooklyn’s District 57. In an interview with CUNY SPS, Forrest credits her nurse training for helping to prepare her for a career in politics.

“Being a nurse teaches you how to think strategically. As a nurse, I learned how to assess patients to determine the severity of their condition and prioritize who’s going to get immediate attention. This training helps me make sense of the many crises we’re dealing with—healthcare workers without protective equipment, police brutality, millions unemployed, and no money for rent. My campaign and my organizing has been so much stronger because of my work as a nurse.”

Phara Souffrant Forest

Phara Souffrant ForrestNicholas, Giselle, Jan, and Phara are just a few of the CUNY SPS nursing students who can speak to the experience of those in their profession. But for them and so many other students—especially for those who are essential workers—the biggest challenge they face right now is still COVID-19.

Our nursing faculty and staff are acutely aware of the many sacrifices our nursing students have made during the pandemic, and try to support them in any way they can. Last spring, the CUNY SPS nursing faculty reached out in a short video to offer their heartfelt thanks, a sentiment echoed this year for all that our nursing students have done and continue to do.

About the CUNY SPS Online Nursing Programs

The CUNY School of Professional Studies offers a portfolio of online degree and advanced certificate programs in nursing in order to help fill the growing void within the healthcare system. Serving as the first fully online nursing degrees in the CUNY system, our programs help nurses advance within their careers while continuing their education in a timely, flexible, and affordable way.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

For over 15 years, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has been leading online education in New York. Notable for offering the most online bachelor’s and master’s degree options at the City University of New York, and for serving transfer students as the University system’s only undergraduate all-transfer college, CUNY SPS meets the needs of adults who wish to finish a bachelor’s degree, progress from an associate’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, and advance in the workplace or change careers.

The School’s growth has been remarkable, with twenty-four degrees launched since 2006. Enrollment has risen by more than 30% in the last four years to over 4,000 students in the credit-bearing programs.  Thousands more are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workplace learning programs. In addition, the School has an active alumni network and has established the CUNY SPS Foundation, which offers multiple scholarship opportunities to current students.

CUNY SPS has consistently been named by U.S. News & World Report as one of the country’s top online institutions. This year, the School was ranked in the top 2% in the nation on the publisher’s list of the 2021 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.

Press Contact
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu

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Joyful reunions among vaccinated parents and children across the country marked this year’s Mother’s Day

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BROOKLYN, NY – The recent COVID pandemic has done much to throw the city’s present and future into question. It especially drew attention to existing forms of socio-economic inequality and systemic problems. To help find ways to make New York City more socially inclusive, Kingsborough Community College (KCC) will present a two-part virtual series titled “The Future of NYC, Post COVID.”

Hosted by KCC’s Department of History, Philosophy and Political Science, the first webinar takes place via Zoom on May 26, 2021 at 3pm. It will offer brief talks by experts from the academic and professional worlds on the subject “Culture and the Everyday,” followed by a Q&A moderated by professors Megan Brandow-Faller and Michael Spear.

The day’s topics include:

COVID-19’S BIOETHICAL CHALLENGES
Michael Barnhart, Professor of Philosophy, Kingsborough Community College/CUNY
COVID-19 has posed its share of bioethical issues. Few of them are new, but some of the more noteworthy include how public health is understood, the limits of private choice, balancing various social needs and public goods, and exacerbation of existing social inequities in medicine, including racism and other forms of discrimination. The talk explores these issues and the prospects for their resolution.

FINDING FASHION IN THE POST-COVID FUTURE
Sonya Abrego, Visiting Assistant Professor, Fordham University, FIT, and Parsons
The pandemic changed global fashion and retail in new and unforeseen ways. It has also shifted how fashion scholars work to understand clothing in and outside of cultural institutions. Will New Yorkers carry pandemic styles into the future or will we see fresh looks and a reevaluation of what it means to get dressed?

WHO STAYS AND WHO GOES? DIVERSITY AND JOB LOSS FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS
Kristin Perkins, Adult Programs Coordinator at the Millbrook Library
Alongside widespread job loss, many cultural institutions responded to the economic devastation of the pandemic with terminations, hiring freezes, or budget shifts to part-time or contract labor. While this impacted all cultural workers, many recent graduates and new professionals have been re-envisioning careers and pivoting to other industries. The pandemic has only served to highlight the precarity in arts labor that already existed, but as class-vulnerable young professionals leave the arts sector, it’s worth examining who stays, who goes, and how arts advocates and industry workers might mitigate the loss of diversity and support young professionals.

THE VIRTUAL MUSEUM? EFFECTS OF THE PANDEMIC ON MUSEUMS AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN NYC
Speaker TBA
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated and exacerbated a number of existing trends in museums and cultural institutions, especially those whose business model is based on maximizing in-person visitation. This talk will draw from the reopening experience of leading NYC museums and cultural institutions to highlight some of the lasting and universal impacts of the pandemic on the museum and cultural sector in NYC.

To join the May 26 webinar, go to https://zoom.us/j/95048557445?pwd=a3QvT2JxSkdGU0ZtSjdrbm9aL2l0UT09, Passcode: 589052.

Part two of “The Future of NYC, Post COVID,” titled “The City’s Economy and Labor Market, Housing, Public Health, and Urban Planning,” will take place in the fall.

About Kingsborough Community College
Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community. Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 10,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program six consecutive times.

###

CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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CNBC's Jim Cramer explains why investors should focus on doing their own homework after earnings reports before selling a stock.

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Matthew Reilly, a groundbreaking CCNY anthropologist, is the recipient of CUNY’s Feliks Gross Award for outstanding Assistant Professors.

Matthew C. Reilly, a pioneering anthropological archaeologist in The City College of New York’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, is a recipient of the 2021 Feliks Gross Award for outstanding Assistant Professors from the City University of New York.

The honor is one of two presented to outstanding assistant professors CUNY-wide by the CUNY Academy for the Humanities and Sciences. The other accolade is the Henry Wasser Award. The Academy selects recipients for the two awards from a large group of highly qualified, academically impressive, assistant professors from all 25 CUNY campuses. Half receive the Gross award and half receive the Wasser award, randomly.

The awards are named after Feliks Gross and Henry Wasser, two of the founders of CUNY Academy for the Humanities and Sciences.

Reilly is assistant professor of anthropology, gender studies, and international studies at City College and affiliated faculty in anthropology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. His archaeological research explores issues of race, colonialism, slavery, and freedom in the Caribbean and West Africa.

In partnership with a visual artist, Reilly’s current project in Barbados explores post-plantation landscapes and heritage. In Liberia, he co-directs the Back-to-Africa Heritage and Archaeology Project, the first archaeological project to explore the 19th century Back-to-Africa movement. In collaboration with Liberian partnering institutions, the project explores sites of settlement and place-making processes through a lens of colonialism, race, and freedom in the post-conflict present. Additionally, he is working on an archival project that investigates the relationship between archaeology and White supremacy as the field took shape in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Reilly is the author of  “Archaeology below the Cliff: Race, Class, and Redlegs in Barbadian Sugar Society,” and co-editor of “Pre-Colonial and Post-Contact Archaeology in Barbados.”

Applauding his award, chair Irina Carlota Silber said Reilly was: “an invaluable member of the department of anthropology, gender studies, and international studies and internationally recognized for his groundbreaking scholarship in historical archaeology, which he leverages to examine critical questions around race, class, and gender in the Atlantic world.

“With specific attention to the Caribbean and the African Diaspora, Matt’s work is also a critical interrogation of Whiteness. Combined with his fluency across the four-fields of anthropology, Matt’s research is key to contributing to our department’s commitment to public scholarship and anti-racist pedagogies.”

Reilly is the second CCNY faculty member to win a Gross or Wasser award this spring. Boukary Sawadogo  of the Division of Humanities and the Arts received the Wasser Award.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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New York City transit workers are once again calling on the city to provide more mental health services after three people halted train services on the same day. Video from the Broad Street subway station shows an emotionally disturbed man who had locked himself inside a train operator’s cab, refusing to open the door for workers and yelling profanity. The...

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Michael Vera, CCNY Class of 2021, is a GEM Fellowship winner.

Already accepted to several top graduate schools including Stanford and Columbia, Michael Vera of The City College of New York’s Class of 2021 is the winner of a highly competitive GEM Fellowship that offers funding for a master’s program in structural engineering at New York University.

GEM fellowships fund master’s and PhDs in engineering for underrepresented students of exceptional quality who intend to work in industry.  Each year, GEM identifies and recruits more than 1,000 undergraduate students, graduate students, and working professionals for admission to advanced degree programs at the nation’s top universities. The National GEM Consortium’s combination of graduate study and field-related internships make GEM fellows more marketable and more competitive upon graduation.

Queens resident Vera is a first-generation college student graduating from City College’s Grove School of Engineering with a BE in civil engineering and numerous honors.

The GEM Fellowship caps an outstanding four years at CCNY for Vera, who worked more than 20 hours a week during his studies. His other national accolades include the National Association of Minority Contractors Scholarship, the Deep Foundation Institute’s Educational Trust Scholarship and the Moles Scholarship.

In addition, Vera, who is graduating magna cum laude and #1 in his class, spent summer 2019 as a Research Fellow at Toyohashi University of Technology, in Toyohashi, Japan. There he participated in research using structural dynamics knowledge to quantify the seismic effect an earthquake acceleration has on different structural models.

Naresh Devineni, associate professor, civil engineering in the Grove School, described Vera’s CCNY experience as an “incredible journey” defined by hard work and success.” He lauded Vera for giving back to CCNY. This includes tutoring SEEK students in math and engineering related courses.

Vera is the third Grove School student to receive a GEM Fellowship in the past three years. Wendy Fernandez was named a Fellow in 2019 and Lizzette Salmeron was a 2020 recipient.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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Planning an outdoor event? Looking for not too hot, not too cold, not too wet weather? Storm Team 4 may be able to help with that. The U.S. government released a massive trove of new climate data this week, setting out 30-year averages for temperatures, precipitation and other factors around the country. Based on that data, here are some dates...

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This article was posted first on HarlemWorldMagazine.com.

Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray today announced Mental Health for All, a new comprehensive plan to deliver universal access to mental health support to all New Yorkers. The plan builds on the work of ThriveNYC and other City agencies and lays out a path to ensure that mental health is a permanent part of City government’s response.

“In New York City, healthcare is not a privilege reserved for those who can afford it. It is a human right for all,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “Mental Health For All is our commitment to every one of the 8.6 million people in our City: we will support you every step of the way in living a happy and healthy life.”

“Every new program from ThriveNYC and City agencies, every expansion of services over the past seven years, is a direct response to what we heard from New Yorkers – who asked for easier access to care, culturally competent counselors who speak their language and more coordination across government and community organizations to solve entrenched problems,” said First Lady Chirlane McCray. “As we emerge from COVID-19, we are building on that foundation. With this executive order and the creation of the Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health, we are ensuring this work will be a lasting contribution to New York City for years to come.”

To address widespread mental health needs, which have deepened during the COVID-19 pandemic, New York City will:

  • Begin universal mental health support at City vaccination sites. As the City vaccinates hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers in the coming weeks at City sites, new Mental Health workers will provide check-ins, mental health support, resources, and connections to care as needed.
  • Create a Community Behavioral Health Academy. Too often, underserved communities don’t have enough behavioral health providers and professionals to support mental health needs. The City will partner with the CUNY School of Professional Studies to create a Community Behavioral Health Academy that will train more than 5,000 City agency staff and social service providers in three years to better support the mental health of the people they serve.
  • Launch a new Mental Health for All website and public education campaign to help New Yorkers navigate all of the mental health resources available to them and find mental health and substance misuse support that meets their needs.

Mayor de Blasio also announced an Executive Order creating a Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health to ensure that mental health for all is a lasting part of City government and a mayoral priority into the future.

The office will be charged with:

  • Overseeing new investments included in the Fiscal Year 2022 Executive budget, including $112M for citywide expansion of mental health teams that will respond to 911 mental health calls and nearly $50M in new services for people with serious mental illness.
  • Managing the $225M in significant community-based mental health services currently supported by ThriveNYC, including services in shelters, Centers for Older Adults, Family Justice Centers, police precincts, and social service agencies.
  • Developing new strategies, such as Communities Thrive, to continue closing gaps in care, providing more support right in communities, and promoting mental health for all.
  • Maximizing promotion of mental health across every part of City government.

Nearly 1.6 million adult New Yorkers experience mental illness every year, and the COVID-19 pandemic has deepened and expanded mental health needs. Prior to the pandemic, approximately 9% of adult New Yorkers experienced symptoms of depression each year. At the height of the pandemic, 44% of adult New Yorkers reported symptoms of anxiety due to COVID-19, 36% reported symptoms of depression, and 35% of adults with children reported that the emotional or behavioral health of a child has been negatively affected. And even before pandemic, New Yorkers of color were at greater risk of mental health challenges yet received less mental health care than white New Yorkers – the pandemic has exposed and exacerbated these disparities.

The Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health will ensure that this commitment remains a lasting part of City government. The new Office will continue ThriveNYC’s practice of regularly publishing a detailed programmatic budget and reach and impact data for each of its programs.

The new Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health builds on the strong foundation of ThriveNYC. Since launching in 2015, ThriveNYC has launched dozens of new programs, implemented by thirteen City agencies and nearly 200 community-based organizations, reaching hundreds of thousands of people every year. For decades, uneven and insufficient federal and state funding for mental health services left hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers without care. ThriveNYC represented the first investment in New York City’s history to close gaps in services, expand where, when and how we deliver mental health support, and work toward a system that reaches all New Yorkers.

“For more than five years, ThriveNYC has added innovative mental health support so more New Yorkers can get the care they need, whenever, wherever, and however they need it,” said Susan Herman, the Director of the Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health. “Building on this strong foundation, the new Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health will continue to invest in community-based strategies that demonstrate the City’s commitment to mental health for all.

“Mental health resources have never been more important or urgent,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Dave A. Chokshi. “We have proven what works and we now have an opportunity to give these services the resources they need to reach all New Yorkers.”

“NYC Health + Hospitals is honored to provide more than 50 percent of the critical mental health care in the City, regardless of ability to pay, immigration status, and other demographics that often make people feel excluded from comprehensive, culturally sensitive care,” said NYC Health + Hospitals President and CEO Mitchell Katz, MD. “Over the years, the City’s public health system has worked tirelessly to ensure that every door remains open for New Yorkers suffering from mental health issues to substance use disorders and more have the affordable access they need to live healthy and full lives. We look forward to continuing this important work with our sister agencies and make sure this crucial work grows and impacts people’s lives.”

“Providing critically needed services to families is part of ACS’ mission in keeping children safe and families supported, and that’s why we are so supportive of the Mental Health for All initiative,” said ACS Commissioner David A. Hansell. “I applaud Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray for this work, which will positively impact the lives of many New Yorkers.”

“The Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity is thrilled to partner with CUNY’s School of Professional Studies to launch the Community Behavioral Health Academy,” said Matthew Klein, Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity. “Community-based organizations have long been on the frontlines of the fight to improve mental health. The Academy builds on NYC Opportunity’s evaluation findings to equip them with the skills and tools they need to help us respond to the lasting impacts of COVID-19 and the long history of structural racism, discrimination, and disinvestment.”

“Our city’s COVID-19 response and recovery is three-fold – mental, physical, and economic. Today’s announcement shifts the focus onto the biggest challenge that we face even prior to the pandemic, ensuring that mental health support is accessible to all New Yorkers – particularly in Black and Brown communities that have been disproportionately affected by violence, health disparities, the loss of loved ones and housing instability. By centralizing mental health resources and providers while creating a pipeline for providers, we are putting our best forward amid a crisis that has taken a devastating toll on New Yorkers of all ages and professions,” said Council Member Farah N. Louis, Chair of the Committee on Mental Health, Disabilities, and Addictions.

“CUNY SPS is very excited to be a part of the development of the Community Behavioral Health Academy,” said John Mogulescu, Dean of the CUNY School of Professional Studies. “Particularly after last year, when COVID-19 stormed the city, the need to provide New Yorkers with mental health support is more critical than ever. What we have endured as a city will be with us for many years and the Academy will serve a major role in helping us to address and recover from this trauma. We are looking forward to collaborating on this important initiative with our partners at the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity.”

“With today’s actions, New York City continues to be at the forefront of integrating mental health into its COVID-19 response and recovery,” said former U.S. Rep. and founder of The Kennedy Forum, Patrick J. Kennedy. “Through their historic investments in mental health, Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray have strengthened the City’s ‘human infrastructure,’ which will benefit New Yorkers for generations to come.”

“Protecting and enhancing mental health is everyone’s interest. For too long, our public officials have been consumed by a focus on expensive, deep-end interventions, forgetting that every “Stage 4” crisis today could have been averted by better interventions long before stage four. Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray are spot on in turning our attention to the importance of mental health for all people at all stages of life, and for working to ensure that every constituent of theirs has an upstream opportunity to access the mental health services and supports they need and want,” said Paul Gionfriddo, President and CEO of Mental Health America.

“Continuing to raise up the importance of mental health and destigmatizing preventative services and treatment is critically important.  Strengthening, adequately resourcing, and integrating the network of providers into these efforts is essential to the success of these vital efforts,” said Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Executive Director, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York.

“New York City does what other governments only talk about. Mayor de Blasio and First Lady McCray use every opportunity to enhance the mental health of New Yorkers. And now they’re paving the way for the next administration to do the same. They have set the bar high and leave a legacy that we must nurture and build upon,” said Linda Rosenberg MSW, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry.

“The impact of COVID-19 on New York City residents will be felt for years,” said Kimberly Williams, President & CEO of Vibrant Emotional Health. “Providing a coordinated and city-wide effort to strengthen and increase access to mental health supports will help to ensure New Yorkers not only recover, but flourish.”

“The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) applauds the creation of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Mental Health Innovation,” said Daniel H. Gillison Jr, NAMI CEO. “The city is making mental health issues a priority, which shows a lasting commitment to provide mental health for all. The time is now for leaders at all levels – community, state and federal government – to follow the precedent set by New York City to ensure that mental health is front and center in COVID-19 recovery efforts to make it easier for people to find the help they need so no one feels alone in their struggle.”