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Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant will allow KCC’s Urban Farm to continue to distribute fresh produce to food insecure Kingsborough students throughout the summer.

Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant will allow KCC’s Urban Farm to continue to distribute fresh produce to food insecure Kingsborough students throughout the summer.

Brooklyn, NY – Students at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) who were facing food insecurity before the pandemic, found themselves in a more dire situation once the campus was forced to close. They no longer had easy access to the campus food pantry or weekly distributions of free produce from KCC’s Urban Farm. With the help of a $9,800 Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant, KCC’s Division of Workforce Development, Strategic Partnerships & Office of Continuing Education will be able to distribute fresh produce direct from the KCC Urban Farm in partnership with the food distribution cooperative Brooklyn Packers and the Brooklyn Supported Agriculture food coop throughout the summer.

In mid-June, the KCC Urban Farm began harvesting produce for pick-up and packaging by Brooklyn Packers. KCC Students can reserve a food box online and either pick them up at the Brooklyn Supported Agriculture’s weekly CSA (community supported agriculture) distribution location in Bedford-Stuyvesant or ask for delivery to their home.

The Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant allowed Urban Farm to hire a produce distribution coordinator to act as communications liaison between their program and the distributors, provide support with the harvest and set-up for the distribution, and reach out to students. Funds are also used to cover transportation costs from the farm to the distribution site and home deliveries, and to purchase post-harvest materials, personal protection equipment and cleaning supplies.

 

About Kingsborough Community College (KCC)

Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top 10 Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

About the KCC Division of Workforce Development, Strategic Partnerships & Office of Continuing Education

The Division has a long history of successfully executing workforce-training programs. Its broad range of programs promotes learning, enrichment and career and professional development. It has provided thousands with job training and college entrance preparation with emphasis on career pathways in health, technology, business and trade, as well as personal development with a focus on health, nutrition and food sustainability.

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CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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The Portland Police Bureau in Oregon declared an unlawful assembly during Saturday night’s protest when people gathered outside a northeast Portland precinct and threw bottles toward officers

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According to early reports, the ongoing COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has disproportionately impacted people of color and low-income communities in the United States.

These health disparities, which are not new to this pandemic, may be attributed to elements of people’s social and physical environments and differing access to resources including health care and support services.

To examine the spatial and demographic nature of reported SARS-CoV-2 diagnoses in New York City and Chicago as of April 13, 2020, CUNY SPH faculty Andrew Maroko, Denis Nash, and Brian Pavilonis conducted a study published in the Journal of Urban Health.

The researchers examined SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis rates per ZIP code tabulation area and compared sociodemographic and economic characteristics between spatial hot spots with high rates of diagnoses, and cold spots with low rates. The characteristics of the hot and cold spots are then compared to reveal differences and similarities between the cities.

The researchers found that, in both Chicago and New York City, cold spots had a higher prevalence of characteristics typically associated with better health outcomes and the ability to maintain physical distance. These neighborhoods tended to be wealthier, have higher educational attainment, higher proportions of non-Hispanic white residents, and more workers in managerial occupations.

Hot spots between the cities also had some similarities, such as lower rates of college graduates and higher proportions of people of color. However, in both cities, it is not the densest areas which appear to be most impacted by SARS-CoV-2, but rather, it is the less-centralized, lower-density neighborhoods.

“In these two large U.S. cities, aside from the striking racial, ethnic, and economic disparities, it doesn’t seem to be as simple as ‘high population density leads to more cases,’” says Maroko. “It appears to be households with more inhabitants, rather than simple overcrowding or overall population density—which may be reflective of neighborhood socioeconomic status—that may be more strongly associated with geographic hot spots.”

The information about the demographic and economic characteristics of hardest-hit areas may help inform more equitable future public health response strategies and direct resources to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 properly and preemptively.

However, the researchers say, the findings may be influenced by factors such as possible outmigration (certain residents leaving the city as the epidemic began) and potential bias and extremely limited testing/reporting and possible false positives/negatives.

The study used data from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Illinois Department of Public Health, and the American Community Survey.

Maroko AR, Nash D, Pavilonis BT. COVID-19 and Inequity: a Comparative Spatial Analysis of New York City and Chicago Hot Spots [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jul 20]. J Urban Health. 2020;1-10. doi:10.1007/s11524-020-00468-0

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California health officials have reported the state’s first coronavirus death of a child

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In the middle of the Spring 2020 semester, the entirety of academic offerings at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) — a college of more than 24,000 students —was shifted to distance learning.

Dealing with the coronavirus pandemic and a state-mandated quarantine, faculty rose to the occasion, redesigning their courses to be delivered through the web conferencing application Zoom, which allows for group meetings and breakout rooms, as well as other platforms.

To reflect on that abrupt dive into teaching online as they prepare for their Fall 2020 courses — the majority of which will be taught online — more than 400 faculty are taking part in a series of Resilient Teaching workshops developed by Associate Professor and Open Knowledge Librarian Jean Amaral, Professor and Faculty Director of the Teaching Collaboratory John Beaumont, and Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Scholarship (CETLS) Director Gina Cherry.

The Resilient Teaching workshops are also supported by a facilitation team that includes E-Learning staff Thomas F. Harbison and Eliza Osae-Kwapong, as well as faculty such as Anthony D. Bishop, one of three Resilient Workshop Zoom facilitators for July, and Brielle Buckler, Shenique Davis, Christina Neubrand, Angela Polite and Rosario Torres.

The goal of the workshops is tofocus on the resilience of both faculty and their students, says Cherry. “For better or worse, all of our faculty gained experience with distance teaching during the spring semester, and we wanted to provide a space for them to build on that experience. We set out to create a community of practice around trauma-informed, culturally sustaining and other pedagogies.”

With those pedagogies enacted, what might “resilient teaching” actually look like?

Jean Amaral leads a staff development workshop before March 2020, when the campus switched to distance learning because of the pandemic and state-directed stay-at-home directive.
Jean Amaral leads a staff development workshop before March 2020, when the campus switched to distance learning because of the pandemic and state-directed stay-at-home directive.

“It’s the faculty member who calls office hours ‘Quarantine Café,’ providing students the space to connect with and support each other,” says Amaral. “It’s the faculty member who offers students different options for completing an assignment, a principle of Universal Design for Learning, and who is flexible with deadlines — a trauma-informed teaching practice. It’s the faculty member who, in choosing technologies to use for their course, considers that many of our students complete their coursework on their phones and weighs what the implications of this might be.”

Gathering to strategize around successful online learning

The Resilient Teaching workshops provide a mix of synchronous (Zoom) and asynchronous (Blackboard) spaces. Participants discuss pedagogical goals, and share activities ranging from icebreakers and alternative assessments, to technologies that create community in their classes.

“Through the Resilient Teaching workshops, we wanted to take full advantage of this rare opportunity to bring hundreds of BMCC faculty together around a virtual table to talk about teaching and learning at BMCC and to discover ways of serving our students in these challenging times and beyond,” Beaumont says, adding that he sends “a special shout out of deep admiration of and appreciation for BMCC’s adjunct faculty, who have generously shared their experience, insights and time with minimal recognition and no pay for this work.”

There has been an unusually high level of participation in the workshops, Amaral says. “We have immense gratitude for all that our faculty are bringing to this work, their considerable time and effort as well as compassion and caring, with no compensation, which is extremely difficult for our adjuncts.”

The workshop units cover topics such as building an awareness of trauma-informed teaching and learning, course design, culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy, Open Education Resources (OER), the range of tools to facilitate student assignments and activities, community building, and assessment in the online environment.

Balancing the focus on technical skills and pedagogy

“Even though I went through the certification to teach online a couple years ago and have taught hybrid courses a few times since, when COVID hit, I still did not feel entirely prepared to teach 100 percent online,” says Professor Hollis Glaser, a participant in the workshops.

“The great thing about this training is it starts with pedagogy, not technology,” she says. “We have readings and assignments that are thinking first about what the students need and how to teach them online. Then it moves into the functions of Blackboard, which they model in the training.”

Another professor, who requests to remain anonymous, would prefer that the workshops were more about technical skills and less about pedagogy.

“While I appreciate the deep emphasis on culturally sustaining pedagogy and universal design in the Resilient Teaching workshops, I have studied these topics extensively through other faculty development trainings at BMCC, and I utilize them as my framework for teaching,” she says. “My expectation coming into this course is that I would receive much needed help with technology.”

In the midst of these critical issues, the workshop participants have kept student success front and center as they apply the precepts of resilient teaching to their classroom practice.

Bishop says the Resilient Teaching workshops “provide a virtual safe space for faculty to enhance their design skills for producing learning content in an online platform and provide students with the best online learning experience possible.”

Supporting student strengths in a season of uncertainty

In one large group following their break-out sessions, participants shared observations about distance teaching, which Professor Angela Polite puts into historical context.

“As a country, we continue to live through a global health crisis, COVID19,” she says. “We are also grappling with how to, once and for all, kill the beast of systemic racism. These two things coupled together have made for a season of uncertainty, fear, anxiety and a loss of hope. These trying times have certainly laid bare the urgent need for resiliency.”

Polite teaches SPE 100 and says she wants to continue teaching her students “not just how to present five speeches, but how to move through course work and life with grace, endurance and strength. It is these things that will have a lasting effect on them in years to come.”

Tim D’Agostino says that while the Resilient Teaching group spans many disciplines, “We share a lot of similarities, and a lot of stress. In terms of expectations, trying to make the most of this learning platform for the students, trying to build as much new technology into it as possible, can be stressful. We have to stay mindful of our own psychological and physical health.”

Eva Kolbusz-Kijne told the larger group that someone in her breakout group said their syllabi should be “written with a pencil.”

“That is going to help me feel more emotionally and intellectually nimble when it comes to my class,” she said. “The second thing I’d like to say is that it is very helpful, the opportunity in the breakout groups to meet colleagues from different departments, not only hearing their advice and their experience, but realizing we are all in the same boat, that we share the same concerns as a community.”

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An attorney for Occupy Wall Street protesters who were arrested says he believes many of the protesters detained during this summer’s Black Lives Matter demonstrations have also been falsely arrested

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Brooklyn, NY – Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is one of eight community colleges selected through a competitive application process to participate in College Success for Single Mothers. Funded by ECMC Foundation and led by the National College Transition Network (NCTN), the goal of the three-year project is to identify the needs of single mother students on campus and develop a plan to expand key practices and services to enhance their college and career success.

Approximately 11 percent of U.S. undergraduates are single mothers. With a powerful motivation to improve the lives of their families and set a positive example for their children, many single mothers pursue education and training that will lead to better-paying work and a meaningful career.

However, often burdened with spending over half their income on housing expenses and a third on child care, single mothers are left with little money for educational expenses. As a result, less than a third graduate from college with either a degree or certificate within six years of enrolling.

One goal of this project is to create a more family-friendly campus that will support the unique needs of these student-parents and their children.

To achieve the project goals, the National College Transition Network (NCTN) is partnering with the Program Evaluation and Research Group at Endicott College, developers of the Family Friendly Campus Toolkit: Using Data to Improve Outcomes, and Achieving the Dream, a national leader in community college reform. These two organizations complement NCTN’s expertise designing effective college and career pathways for adult learners.

College Success for Single Mothers builds on NCTN’s 2019 report, No Matter What Obstacle is Thrown My Way, which documents examples of 17 community colleges that offer targeted programming for student parents. The report recommends that significant work remains to increase institutional capacity to collect data to identify single mothers on campus; provide professional development to faculty and staff on the needs of single mothers; develop diverse and flexible funding sources; and advocate for policies within and outside of the institutions that support single mothers.

 

About Kingsborough Community College | www.kbcc.cuny.edu

Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top 10 Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

About World Education | www.worlded.org

Founded in 1951, World Education, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of the poor through education, and economic and social development. World Education has worked in more than 50 countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Their work focuses on nonformal and formal education for children and adults; support for AIDS orphans and vulnerable children; refugee training; elimination of child labor and human trafficking; community development; maternal and child health; and micro enterprise development. In the United States, World Education advances the economic mobility of vulnerable people and communities through education. It strengthens the effectiveness of educators, organizations, and systems to support adults, older youth, and communities to thrive.

About National College Transition Network (NCTN) | www.collegetransition.org

A project of World Education, Inc., The National College Transition Network (NCTN) provides technical assistance and professional development services to community college, adult education, and workforce systems. They design accelerated career pathways, comprehensive student support services, and effective multi-stakeholder partnerships that help adults attain their educational and career goals and access greater economic opportunity.

About Achieving the Dream (ATD) | www.achievingthedream.org

Achieving the Dream leads a growing network of 277 community colleges committed to helping their students, particularly low-income students and students of color, achieve their goals for academic success, personal growth, and economic opportunity. ATD is making progress in closing academic achievement gaps and accelerating student success through a unique change process that builds each college’s institutional capacities in seven essential areas.

About the Program Evaluation and Research Group at Endicott College 

The Program Evaluation & Research Group (PERG) provides planning, evaluation and applied research services in support of quality educational programs in formal and informal settings.

About ECMC Foundation | www.ecmcfoundation.org

ECMC Foundation is a Los Angeles-based, nationally focused foundation whose mission is to inspire and to facilitate improvements that affect educational outcomes—especially among underserved populations—through evidence-based innovation. It is one of several affiliates under the ECMC Group enterprise based in Minneapolis. ECMC Foundation makes investments in two focus areas: College Success and Career Readiness; and uses a spectrum of funding structures, including strategic grantmaking and program-related investments, to invest in both nonprofit and for-profit ventures.

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CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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The coronavirus pandemic has changed the lives of many in Corona, a Latino neighborhood in Queens that registered the highest overall case and death counts in New York City

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Grace McGrath of CCNY’s Macaulay Honors College program is a 2020 Palantir Women In Technology Scholar.

Grace McGrath of the Macaulay Honors College program at The City College of New York is one of 10 undergraduates named 2020 Palantir Women In Technology Scholars. The highly competitive program created by software manufacturer Palantir is open to students in U.S., Canadian and Mexican institutions majoring in or planning to major in Science, Technology, Engineering or Math (STEM) fields.

The Palantir Women in Technology Scholarship was incepted in 2010 to celebrate and support women who are beginning careers in technology. It seeks to encourage women to pursue computer science, engineering, and technical studies, and to become leaders in these fields. Recipients are each awarded $7,000 grants to support their education.

A junior, McGrath is an electrical engineering major pursuing a minor in the classics. The Bronx resident joins the latest cohort of Palantir Scholars from several other top universities including Yale, Cornell, Drexel, McGill, George Mason and the University of Texas – Austin.

Depending on the COVID-19 situation, McGrath and her colleagues may attend an all-expenses paid developmental workshop at Palantir headquarters in Palo Alto, California, in the fall. Programming there will include professional development sessions and breakout sessions with Palantir engineers.

The Palantir Scholarship adds to McGrath’s numerous awards at CCNY. She’s a member of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society; is on the CCNY Dean’s List; is a 2019-2020 S Jay Levy Fellow, and received a 2019 Turner Construction Engineering Scholarship through the Society of Women Engineers.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:  jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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A New York City police vehicle struck and killed a motorcyclist while responding to a shooting Saturday in Brooklyn. Police said the marked SUV had lights flashing and sirens blaring as it collided with the motorcycle while proceeding through an intersection around 9:25 p.m. in the borough’s Williamsburg neighborhood. The 37-year-old motorcyclist was thrown to the pavement and sustained severe...

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Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant will allow KCC’s Urban Farm to continue to distribute fresh produce to food insecure Kingsborough students throughout the summer.

Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant will allow KCC’s Urban Farm to continue to distribute fresh produce to food insecure Kingsborough students throughout the summer.

Brooklyn, NY – Students at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) who were facing food insecurity before the pandemic, found themselves in a more dire situation once the campus was forced to close. They no longer had easy access to the campus food pantry or weekly distributions of free produce from KCC’s Urban Farm. With the help of a $9,800 Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant, KCC’s Division of Workforce Development, Strategic Partnerships & Office of Continuing Education will be able to distribute fresh produce direct from the KCC Urban Farm in partnership with the food distribution cooperative Brooklyn Packers and the Brooklyn Supported Agriculture food coop throughout the summer.

In mid-June, the KCC Urban Farm began harvesting produce for pick-up and packaging by Brooklyn Packers. KCC Students can reserve a food box online and either pick them up at the Brooklyn Supported Agriculture’s weekly CSA (community supported agriculture) distribution location in Bedford-Stuyvesant or ask for delivery to their home.

The Brooklyn Community Foundation COVID Response Grant allowed Urban Farm to hire a produce distribution coordinator to act as communications liaison between their program and the distributors, provide support with the harvest and set-up for the distribution, and reach out to students. Funds are also used to cover transportation costs from the farm to the distribution site and home deliveries, and to purchase post-harvest materials, personal protection equipment and cleaning supplies.

 

About Kingsborough Community College (KCC)

Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top 10 Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

About the KCC Division of Workforce Development, Strategic Partnerships & Office of Continuing Education

The Division has a long history of successfully executing workforce-training programs. Its broad range of programs promotes learning, enrichment and career and professional development. It has provided thousands with job training and college entrance preparation with emphasis on career pathways in health, technology, business and trade, as well as personal development with a focus on health, nutrition and food sustainability.

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CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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The Portland Police Bureau in Oregon declared an unlawful assembly during Saturday night’s protest when people gathered outside a northeast Portland precinct and threw bottles toward officers

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According to early reports, the ongoing COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has disproportionately impacted people of color and low-income communities in the United States.

These health disparities, which are not new to this pandemic, may be attributed to elements of people’s social and physical environments and differing access to resources including health care and support services.

To examine the spatial and demographic nature of reported SARS-CoV-2 diagnoses in New York City and Chicago as of April 13, 2020, CUNY SPH faculty Andrew Maroko, Denis Nash, and Brian Pavilonis conducted a study published in the Journal of Urban Health.

The researchers examined SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis rates per ZIP code tabulation area and compared sociodemographic and economic characteristics between spatial hot spots with high rates of diagnoses, and cold spots with low rates. The characteristics of the hot and cold spots are then compared to reveal differences and similarities between the cities.

The researchers found that, in both Chicago and New York City, cold spots had a higher prevalence of characteristics typically associated with better health outcomes and the ability to maintain physical distance. These neighborhoods tended to be wealthier, have higher educational attainment, higher proportions of non-Hispanic white residents, and more workers in managerial occupations.

Hot spots between the cities also had some similarities, such as lower rates of college graduates and higher proportions of people of color. However, in both cities, it is not the densest areas which appear to be most impacted by SARS-CoV-2, but rather, it is the less-centralized, lower-density neighborhoods.

“In these two large U.S. cities, aside from the striking racial, ethnic, and economic disparities, it doesn’t seem to be as simple as ‘high population density leads to more cases,’” says Maroko. “It appears to be households with more inhabitants, rather than simple overcrowding or overall population density—which may be reflective of neighborhood socioeconomic status—that may be more strongly associated with geographic hot spots.”

The information about the demographic and economic characteristics of hardest-hit areas may help inform more equitable future public health response strategies and direct resources to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 properly and preemptively.

However, the researchers say, the findings may be influenced by factors such as possible outmigration (certain residents leaving the city as the epidemic began) and potential bias and extremely limited testing/reporting and possible false positives/negatives.

The study used data from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Illinois Department of Public Health, and the American Community Survey.

Maroko AR, Nash D, Pavilonis BT. COVID-19 and Inequity: a Comparative Spatial Analysis of New York City and Chicago Hot Spots [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jul 20]. J Urban Health. 2020;1-10. doi:10.1007/s11524-020-00468-0

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California health officials have reported the state’s first coronavirus death of a child

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In the middle of the Spring 2020 semester, the entirety of academic offerings at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) — a college of more than 24,000 students —was shifted to distance learning.

Dealing with the coronavirus pandemic and a state-mandated quarantine, faculty rose to the occasion, redesigning their courses to be delivered through the web conferencing application Zoom, which allows for group meetings and breakout rooms, as well as other platforms.

To reflect on that abrupt dive into teaching online as they prepare for their Fall 2020 courses — the majority of which will be taught online — more than 400 faculty are taking part in a series of Resilient Teaching workshops developed by Associate Professor and Open Knowledge Librarian Jean Amaral, Professor and Faculty Director of the Teaching Collaboratory John Beaumont, and Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Scholarship (CETLS) Director Gina Cherry.

The Resilient Teaching workshops are also supported by a facilitation team that includes E-Learning staff Thomas F. Harbison and Eliza Osae-Kwapong, as well as faculty such as Anthony D. Bishop, one of three Resilient Workshop Zoom facilitators for July, and Brielle Buckler, Shenique Davis, Christina Neubrand, Angela Polite and Rosario Torres.

The goal of the workshops is tofocus on the resilience of both faculty and their students, says Cherry. “For better or worse, all of our faculty gained experience with distance teaching during the spring semester, and we wanted to provide a space for them to build on that experience. We set out to create a community of practice around trauma-informed, culturally sustaining and other pedagogies.”

With those pedagogies enacted, what might “resilient teaching” actually look like?

Jean Amaral leads a staff development workshop before March 2020, when the campus switched to distance learning because of the pandemic and state-directed stay-at-home directive.
Jean Amaral leads a staff development workshop before March 2020, when the campus switched to distance learning because of the pandemic and state-directed stay-at-home directive.

“It’s the faculty member who calls office hours ‘Quarantine Café,’ providing students the space to connect with and support each other,” says Amaral. “It’s the faculty member who offers students different options for completing an assignment, a principle of Universal Design for Learning, and who is flexible with deadlines — a trauma-informed teaching practice. It’s the faculty member who, in choosing technologies to use for their course, considers that many of our students complete their coursework on their phones and weighs what the implications of this might be.”

Gathering to strategize around successful online learning

The Resilient Teaching workshops provide a mix of synchronous (Zoom) and asynchronous (Blackboard) spaces. Participants discuss pedagogical goals, and share activities ranging from icebreakers and alternative assessments, to technologies that create community in their classes.

“Through the Resilient Teaching workshops, we wanted to take full advantage of this rare opportunity to bring hundreds of BMCC faculty together around a virtual table to talk about teaching and learning at BMCC and to discover ways of serving our students in these challenging times and beyond,” Beaumont says, adding that he sends “a special shout out of deep admiration of and appreciation for BMCC’s adjunct faculty, who have generously shared their experience, insights and time with minimal recognition and no pay for this work.”

There has been an unusually high level of participation in the workshops, Amaral says. “We have immense gratitude for all that our faculty are bringing to this work, their considerable time and effort as well as compassion and caring, with no compensation, which is extremely difficult for our adjuncts.”

The workshop units cover topics such as building an awareness of trauma-informed teaching and learning, course design, culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy, Open Education Resources (OER), the range of tools to facilitate student assignments and activities, community building, and assessment in the online environment.

Balancing the focus on technical skills and pedagogy

“Even though I went through the certification to teach online a couple years ago and have taught hybrid courses a few times since, when COVID hit, I still did not feel entirely prepared to teach 100 percent online,” says Professor Hollis Glaser, a participant in the workshops.

“The great thing about this training is it starts with pedagogy, not technology,” she says. “We have readings and assignments that are thinking first about what the students need and how to teach them online. Then it moves into the functions of Blackboard, which they model in the training.”

Another professor, who requests to remain anonymous, would prefer that the workshops were more about technical skills and less about pedagogy.

“While I appreciate the deep emphasis on culturally sustaining pedagogy and universal design in the Resilient Teaching workshops, I have studied these topics extensively through other faculty development trainings at BMCC, and I utilize them as my framework for teaching,” she says. “My expectation coming into this course is that I would receive much needed help with technology.”

In the midst of these critical issues, the workshop participants have kept student success front and center as they apply the precepts of resilient teaching to their classroom practice.

Bishop says the Resilient Teaching workshops “provide a virtual safe space for faculty to enhance their design skills for producing learning content in an online platform and provide students with the best online learning experience possible.”

Supporting student strengths in a season of uncertainty

In one large group following their break-out sessions, participants shared observations about distance teaching, which Professor Angela Polite puts into historical context.

“As a country, we continue to live through a global health crisis, COVID19,” she says. “We are also grappling with how to, once and for all, kill the beast of systemic racism. These two things coupled together have made for a season of uncertainty, fear, anxiety and a loss of hope. These trying times have certainly laid bare the urgent need for resiliency.”

Polite teaches SPE 100 and says she wants to continue teaching her students “not just how to present five speeches, but how to move through course work and life with grace, endurance and strength. It is these things that will have a lasting effect on them in years to come.”

Tim D’Agostino says that while the Resilient Teaching group spans many disciplines, “We share a lot of similarities, and a lot of stress. In terms of expectations, trying to make the most of this learning platform for the students, trying to build as much new technology into it as possible, can be stressful. We have to stay mindful of our own psychological and physical health.”

Eva Kolbusz-Kijne told the larger group that someone in her breakout group said their syllabi should be “written with a pencil.”

“That is going to help me feel more emotionally and intellectually nimble when it comes to my class,” she said. “The second thing I’d like to say is that it is very helpful, the opportunity in the breakout groups to meet colleagues from different departments, not only hearing their advice and their experience, but realizing we are all in the same boat, that we share the same concerns as a community.”

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An attorney for Occupy Wall Street protesters who were arrested says he believes many of the protesters detained during this summer’s Black Lives Matter demonstrations have also been falsely arrested

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Brooklyn, NY – Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is one of eight community colleges selected through a competitive application process to participate in College Success for Single Mothers. Funded by ECMC Foundation and led by the National College Transition Network (NCTN), the goal of the three-year project is to identify the needs of single mother students on campus and develop a plan to expand key practices and services to enhance their college and career success.

Approximately 11 percent of U.S. undergraduates are single mothers. With a powerful motivation to improve the lives of their families and set a positive example for their children, many single mothers pursue education and training that will lead to better-paying work and a meaningful career.

However, often burdened with spending over half their income on housing expenses and a third on child care, single mothers are left with little money for educational expenses. As a result, less than a third graduate from college with either a degree or certificate within six years of enrolling.

One goal of this project is to create a more family-friendly campus that will support the unique needs of these student-parents and their children.

To achieve the project goals, the National College Transition Network (NCTN) is partnering with the Program Evaluation and Research Group at Endicott College, developers of the Family Friendly Campus Toolkit: Using Data to Improve Outcomes, and Achieving the Dream, a national leader in community college reform. These two organizations complement NCTN’s expertise designing effective college and career pathways for adult learners.

College Success for Single Mothers builds on NCTN’s 2019 report, No Matter What Obstacle is Thrown My Way, which documents examples of 17 community colleges that offer targeted programming for student parents. The report recommends that significant work remains to increase institutional capacity to collect data to identify single mothers on campus; provide professional development to faculty and staff on the needs of single mothers; develop diverse and flexible funding sources; and advocate for policies within and outside of the institutions that support single mothers.

 

About Kingsborough Community College | www.kbcc.cuny.edu

Founded in 1963, Kingsborough Community College is Brooklyn’s only community college and is part of the City University of New York (CUNY). Located on a 70-acre campus in Manhattan Beach, Kingsborough remains firmly committed to its mission of providing both liberal arts and career education, promoting student learning and development, as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community.  Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 10,000 full- and part-time students annually and an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education program, Kingsborough has earned recognition as a Leader College of Distinction for excellence in student success by Achieving the Dream, and has been identified as a Top 10 Community College in the nation by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program.

About World Education | www.worlded.org

Founded in 1951, World Education, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of the poor through education, and economic and social development. World Education has worked in more than 50 countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Their work focuses on nonformal and formal education for children and adults; support for AIDS orphans and vulnerable children; refugee training; elimination of child labor and human trafficking; community development; maternal and child health; and micro enterprise development. In the United States, World Education advances the economic mobility of vulnerable people and communities through education. It strengthens the effectiveness of educators, organizations, and systems to support adults, older youth, and communities to thrive.

About National College Transition Network (NCTN) | www.collegetransition.org

A project of World Education, Inc., The National College Transition Network (NCTN) provides technical assistance and professional development services to community college, adult education, and workforce systems. They design accelerated career pathways, comprehensive student support services, and effective multi-stakeholder partnerships that help adults attain their educational and career goals and access greater economic opportunity.

About Achieving the Dream (ATD) | www.achievingthedream.org

Achieving the Dream leads a growing network of 277 community colleges committed to helping their students, particularly low-income students and students of color, achieve their goals for academic success, personal growth, and economic opportunity. ATD is making progress in closing academic achievement gaps and accelerating student success through a unique change process that builds each college’s institutional capacities in seven essential areas.

About the Program Evaluation and Research Group at Endicott College 

The Program Evaluation & Research Group (PERG) provides planning, evaluation and applied research services in support of quality educational programs in formal and informal settings.

About ECMC Foundation | www.ecmcfoundation.org

ECMC Foundation is a Los Angeles-based, nationally focused foundation whose mission is to inspire and to facilitate improvements that affect educational outcomes—especially among underserved populations—through evidence-based innovation. It is one of several affiliates under the ECMC Group enterprise based in Minneapolis. ECMC Foundation makes investments in two focus areas: College Success and Career Readiness; and uses a spectrum of funding structures, including strategic grantmaking and program-related investments, to invest in both nonprofit and for-profit ventures.

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CONTACT: Cheryl Todmann | cheryl.todmann@kbcc.cuny.edu | C: (646) 897-2508 | T: (718) 368-6760

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The coronavirus pandemic has changed the lives of many in Corona, a Latino neighborhood in Queens that registered the highest overall case and death counts in New York City

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Grace McGrath of CCNY’s Macaulay Honors College program is a 2020 Palantir Women In Technology Scholar.

Grace McGrath of the Macaulay Honors College program at The City College of New York is one of 10 undergraduates named 2020 Palantir Women In Technology Scholars. The highly competitive program created by software manufacturer Palantir is open to students in U.S., Canadian and Mexican institutions majoring in or planning to major in Science, Technology, Engineering or Math (STEM) fields.

The Palantir Women in Technology Scholarship was incepted in 2010 to celebrate and support women who are beginning careers in technology. It seeks to encourage women to pursue computer science, engineering, and technical studies, and to become leaders in these fields. Recipients are each awarded $7,000 grants to support their education.

A junior, McGrath is an electrical engineering major pursuing a minor in the classics. The Bronx resident joins the latest cohort of Palantir Scholars from several other top universities including Yale, Cornell, Drexel, McGill, George Mason and the University of Texas – Austin.

Depending on the COVID-19 situation, McGrath and her colleagues may attend an all-expenses paid developmental workshop at Palantir headquarters in Palo Alto, California, in the fall. Programming there will include professional development sessions and breakout sessions with Palantir engineers.

The Palantir Scholarship adds to McGrath’s numerous awards at CCNY. She’s a member of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society; is on the CCNY Dean’s List; is a 2019-2020 S Jay Levy Fellow, and received a 2019 Turner Construction Engineering Scholarship through the Society of Women Engineers.

About the City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high-quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its position at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.8% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. Labor analytics firm Emsi puts at $1.9 billion CCNY’s annual economic impact on the regional economy (5 boroughs and 5 adjacent counties) and quantifies the “for dollar” return on investment to students, taxpayers and society. At City College, more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:  jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit.

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A New York City police vehicle struck and killed a motorcyclist while responding to a shooting Saturday in Brooklyn. Police said the marked SUV had lights flashing and sirens blaring as it collided with the motorcycle while proceeding through an intersection around 9:25 p.m. in the borough’s Williamsburg neighborhood. The 37-year-old motorcyclist was thrown to the pavement and sustained severe...